TRAIN CHILD FOR LIFESKILL

The Bible says train a child in the way they should go so when they grow they will not depart from it. Especially boys are struggling because they do not express their real feelings for fear of being judged weak. This program is wonderful so must continue through teenage years into adulthood. Limited resources must not stop mentoring them at the most critical times in their lives. Like other Science projects of Professor Robert Wilson among others this program must continue for the next few more years so their hard work will not be in vain. This men are doing a great job and need sponsors to extend it further beyond childhood. It will be good to follow up throughout their teenage and adult years so they retain their knowledge and manners. Other peers and friends that come into their lives later without similar training can influence the vulnerable ones. So need help and support of well wishers to continue this program into teenage years, university, training for skills, careers to transition into adult life. Programmes like First University of the Child and Connections in the Secondary Schools enable children to get the right guidance required. In the past projects were limited to 4 years funding if run by government and then changed into another project for the sake of funding conditions. This is not sufficient long term to help them fully grasp life goals for good success. Their contemporaries often get private fundings to develop practical life skills to continue into business men or the chief executives of corporate bodies. While this program is highly valued and appreciated, please let it not be another statistics of 1% success years later because others drifted off. Coach Carter stood by his basketball playing students in their teenage years despite challenges faced. Please continue this hard work into the future so we look forward to more success from this story. Please ask for more help if you need it to support this program. If you can help please do not wait to be asked first because this good success impacts the community and nation as a whole. Well done and God bless you for your sacrifices and precious times devoted to helping these priceless children. Please encourage their reading skills and academic studies too like Coach Carter. EYE CONTACT IS CRUCIAL BECAUSE OTHER CULTURES TEACH CHILDREN OUT OF RESPECT NOT TO LOOK DIRECTLY INTO EYES OF ELDERS. Misunderstood by Western Countries as “lying” unable to keep eye contact, picked on needlessly, harrassed by law enforcement, lacking important knowledge to understand the difference in the upbringing of children by other cultures. This Instagram photo by @bayouredd

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MY LIFE AFTER UNIVERSITY

Kevin BrochMy life changed after university moving home, losing friends, broke unemployed after university. Kevin Broch left uni. with a short feeling of relief and a sense of achievement, followed by a long feeling of being lost. It’s the end of university and, if luck is on your side, you have had the best three years of your life. The nightlife was amazing; you’ve made lots of new, life-long friends, spending hours in the library on coursework and preparing for exams. Hopefully, this has paid off but what now? This is question many students ask themselves when they graduate but few realise adult life is about to come down on them like a tonne of bricks. When Kevin Broch graduated from Royal Holloway University of London, in 2015, was looking forward to leaving uni and beginning professional life. But, the feeling of hopefulness soon turned to helplessness.

‘Heartbroken’

Now a successful music producer, Kevin says teachers prepared him for leaving college and entering university – but when university comes to an end “no-one tells you what is next now it’s down to you. “I had short feeling of relief and a sense of achievement followed by long feeling of being lost,” he says. Many students say the final year of university tends to be the most stressful and that they can’t wait to hand in dissertations and be done with it.

Claire GambleClaire Gamble found it really hard to meet people or settle into new life after university

But leaving can feel like an anticlimax, and that unique feeling of excitement, stimulation and freedom that university provided can be hard to replace. Claire Gamble, 33, says: “I felt heartbroken moving out of my house on last day of university I couldn’t stop crying.” After four great years of living independently and making solid friends while studying at University of Sheffield didn’t know what was happening next. Claire is not alone. Loneliness seems to be common feature of graduation blues. Kayleigh Rattle, 31, graduated from Warwick University in 2008, says: “Never forgets indescribable loneliness felt leaving university. “And, actually, I try not to think about the experience too much today because it still triggers a wistfulness so palpable for a time that’s now passed, and happened a decade ago.”

New identity

Many students aren’t ready to say their goodbye to close companions when they all go home. University prepares young people for transition from adolescence into adulthood but not the realities of working life? Graduate employment rate stands at 82% according to the Office of National Statistics in 2017, so it takes time to secure a fulltime job. So after three years of relative freedom, hordes of students will probably find themselves packing their bags and trundling back home to their parents’ house. Kayleigh says: “I really struggled with that – having a curfew again, not being able to sleep in the same bedroom as my boyfriend, and, I felt, being treated like a child again.”

Kayleigh RattleKayleigh Rattle describes university as combination of indispensable relationships and learning

This feeling of stepping backwards can be an extra incentive to find a “proper job”. Carolyn Mumby, counsellor coach with British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, says: “The return home can feel like trying to squash yourself back into the shape of your previous self. “It can be challenging to maintain your autonomy. “You may be challenging autonomy of your parents and carers who have adjusted to life without you living at home. There is a renegotiation of roles and relationships. Sophie Phillipson, 27, felt “ovewhelmed” and “nervous” at the prospect of facing adult life. She went on to found the website HelloGrads, which offers skills to help ease the transition from education to working life. She says: “You come out with a good degree and then reality hits. And it’s quite difficult because you think you’re going to get a good job, if you don’t, you can become overwhelmed.” Emily Williams, 24, and a Sheffield Hallam graduate, took a job that was really disappointing. She says she used to walk to work every day and think: “How can I get slightly injured, not enough to be seriously hurt or die, but just enough so I don’t have to go to work?” She suggests people take time to find out what they want to do. “There is absolutely no shame in going back home and getting a job at your local supermarket whilst you figure out what your passions are,” she says. “Don’t feel like you should already know what you want to do.”

Julie and Sophie PhillipsonSophie Phillipson, and her mother, Julie, set up website HelloGrads to help other young people transition from university into adult working life

Sophie says: “There’s a lot more to consider than you first think – and nobody tells you. “Money is constantly on your mind and there is a huge pressure to succeed from your parents, even though they have the best intentions.”

‘Blagging it’

Student fees tripled in 2012 and Sophie believes this has a part to play in the pressure students place on themselves to succeed and make their degree “worth it.” Social media doesn’t help. “No-one posts the countless rejections they faced to get to their position,” Sophie says. But it isn’t all doom and gloom. Graduates are still likely to be employed than people with fewer qualifications. Claire says that although leaving university was tough, 12 years on she is settled, has a family of her own and a successful business. She believes young people shouldn’t expect working life to be like university. But should “embrace new challenges, because your next adventures are just beginning.” Emily seconds this and says: “No-one has a clue what they’re doing. People in their 30s tell me they don’t feel like proper adults yet. “Everyone is going with the flow and blagging it as they go.”

 

11 TIPS FOR THE UNIVERSITY

1. Manage your workload

Kaylie Knowles, 24, studied at Nottingham Trent University, then did her PGCE at Derby University. She says staying on top of workload is crucial. “I got on just fine doing my undergrad at Trent, but my final year at Derby was a very stressful year leading me to four or five meltdowns across the year. “All I’d say is prioritise your workload and make sure you take a break when you feel the workload is getting too much. “

2. Plan a weekly budget

Mary O’Connell, 23, who did English literature at York University and an MA in Film Studies at King’s College London, recommends setting yourself a weekly budget. Don’t spend all your money on Freshers Week. If you haven’t really worked before uni then you may not have seen that much money in your account before. But remember that it’s still a loan that you need to be sensible with.Mary O'ConnellLearn to manage your loan as crucial. Plan a weekly budget. You can use an app to track your spending if you want to get an idea of how much you’re spending, because it’s something we usually underestimate.” Sian Reed, 25, studied marketing at Hull University, followed by an MA in sports journalism at Sheffield Hallam, agrees. “My first top tip would be learn to budget. I know it sounds all serious but just because your student loan has come in, doesn’t mean you should spend it all at once. “Just take half an hour or so to sit down and look at what money you have coming in and what you’re spending. “It might mean making some adjustments like boosting your income or reducing your spending (ask for a student discount everywhere, you’ll be surprised at the sort of places that offer it as they don’t always advertise) but it means you can live comfortably.”

3. Back up your work

Peter Rogers, 22, who graduated from York University last year, says it’s a good idea to back up your work in more than one place. We all gmail accounts through our university, so I used Google Drive to save everything which meant it was stored in the cloud. “One piece of advice would be to make sure you save different versions of a piece of work as you go along.Peter RogersPeter recommends back up your work in more than one place. For example, if writing an essay on French Revolution, save it as ‘French Revolution half’ at the halfway stage, and then again as a separate version three-quarters of the way through, etc. “That way if you do manage to delete a copy you will not have to rewrite from the beginning.”

4. Make use of first year

Peter also says that the first year can often be a little lighter academically than subsequent years, so it’s worth enjoying it. “If your first year doesn’t count towards your overall grade, make the most of the freedom that offers you,” he suggests. “I still look back and wish I had done a little less work (nobody asks me what grade I got in first year) and spent more time trying out activities, sports or just hanging out with friends. “Obviously the academic side is important but that really amps up in second and third year anyway.”

5. Choose your friends

Emmeke Megannety 21, a second-year journalism student at Nottingham Trent University, says it’s worth taking your time to find good friends. People starting uni need to remember that the people you meet in your first week will not necessarily be your friends for life.Emmeke MegannetyEmmeke, 21, says friendships take time to evolve don’t think you have to stick to people like glue because you haven’t met anyone else yet. “Throw yourself into activities and societies, get a job, strike up conversation with someone at the gym you’ll make so many friends throughout the year in the oddest of places. Mary recommends joining all societies that interest you. You don’t just want your uni friends to be people on your course and who you live with, join a society to make friends there,” she says. It’s a good way to socialise cheaply if you’re not a big drinker. It makes the uni experience more fulfilling.”

6. Look out for people

Sadly many students suffer with mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety. Recent statistics show 146 students took their lives in 2016.  Peter says it’s important to keep an eye on peers and ask searching questions. I was, and continue to be, regularly surprised at the number of people who would look and act fine outwardly but were actually really struggling. “I think the key is talking directly, especially with men. I know if I were just asked ‘How are you feeling?’ I’d probably just skirt around the question with a generic answer. “But if a friend asked ‘Do you think your mental health has been affected by….?’ we might be tempted to answer more honestly.”

7. Eat a balanced diet

Matt Broderick, 29, a graduate from Queens University Belfast, says a poor diet can affect your mood. “Learn to cook and go to class. I did neither of these things, or very, very little. “I spent all of my money on really unhealthy oven food or nasty takeaways and barely went to lectures. I didn’t realise at the time but was probably depressed because I was living in an awfully cold and dark house, eating dreadful food and only really leaving the house to go drinking with the odd class or lecture thrown in. I wish I could hit the reset button and go to every single lecture, do all of my readings, eat better and spend my time more wisely rather than drinking away my student loan.”

8. Cook on a budget

Picking up on the issue of food, Mary recommends learning how to cook on a budget. “Stop caring about brands just because you have them at home,” she advises. For example, if you’re making something like a bolognese then buy the ‘basics’ version of chopped tomatoes. It’s not an ingredient you need to have a special brand for – chopped tomatoes is chopped tomatoes.Sian ReedSIAN REED says it’s important to “stay true to yourself. “Tupperware is your friend: Cook food in bulk then freeze it in meal-sized portions.” Peter adds: “Like many students I didn’t really have anything other than rudimentary cookery skills before I went, and found learning to cook was reasonably enjoyable.”

9. Talk to friends/ family

Mary says keeping in touch with family and friends from back home is a good way of keeping loneliness at bay, and a good chance to speak openly about any problems. “Uni can be very lonely. Make sure you check in with your home friends who are also at uni and keep track of who might be having a hard time, and make sure you tell your friends if you find yourself struggling.”

10. Stay true to yourself

Sian’s top tip for university is “stay true to yourself.” Students living from home the first time without parent, “You don’t have to be extrovert to enjoy experience don’t feel obliged to go on all nights out because feel forced to regret in morning drinking or involved with the strangers who take advantage of you. “University seems to create a drinking culture so it’s okay if you’re not into it. Trust me, you will not be only non-drinker on campus if you do not join in. “If big personality, make most of student life safely but not, naively to cheapen your life in uni.”

11. REMEMBER: BE SAFE ON CAMPUS

Do not let in student stranger you met just because you feel lonely. Never let in anyone in your bedroom alone for coffee they may think you consent to sex by inviting them into your space. If they rape you people assume you asked for it by allowing them to follow you into your private personal space. If they tamper with your drink you may not be alert to resist them but still think you are in control. Protect yourself from suspicious friendships. Don’t be fooled by their kindness to let your guard down. As soon you are at the entrance of your place say goodbye OUTSIDE NO OFFER OF COFFEE inside. Go to sleep.

70% 70% 70% 70%
*💰💰💰💰💰💰💰*

*Dead’s money remains in the bank…*

*The living lack money to spend yet…*

*There is still a lot of money not spent.*

*Business tycoon in China died so rich*
*Widow $1.9billion married chauffeur*

*Chauffeur thought he worked for boss*
*but boss rather worked for him!!!*

*Important to live longer than wealthy*

*Strong healthy body works for one.*

*Best phone’s 70% functions useless!*

* 70% car speed or gadgets not needed*

*Luxury mansion’s 70% space unused*

*Wardrobe full of clothes 70% unworn*

*Life work earning’s 70% others spend*

*Protect and make full use of our 30%.*

👉*Go for medical check-ups regularly*
👉*Drink more water, if not thirsty.*
👉*Let go of problems faced daily.*
👉*Endeavour to give in, if in the right.*
👉*Remain humble if rich powerful.*
👉*Be contented, if you are not rich.*
👉*Exercise mind and body if busy.*
👉*Make time for people you care for*

*Please☝🏾Ponder*

Reblogged & Updated

Produced by Katherine Sellgren and Shamaan Freeman-Powell

GOD IS KNOWLEDGE GIVER

Psalm 119:99-100 says that students can have more knowledge, insight and more understanding than all their teachers as testimony of God’s gift, talent or favour. Honouring God, by meditating on word of God, following precept by precept to listen accurately and obey instruction means knowledge expands. I understand more than the ancients, because I keep God’s precepts. God gave Daniel knowledge, intelligence in all letters and in science. Daniel had understanding in all science and interpretation of visions, complex dreams. Daniel 1:4-17 praised the young men without blemish, handsome, gifted in all wisdom. Children in whom there was no blemish, well-favoured, skilful in all wisdom and knowledge with an understanding of science. These four young men God gave them knowledge and skill in all kinds of science of their time. God gave to Daniel special ability in understanding meanings of dreams like Joseph. Daniel and his friends had more knowledge in science and wisdom because of God’s Hands upon their lives. They impressed Babylon king in Iraq so much with knowledge God gave them so they were made courtiers in the king’s palace. They advised the king and also Daniel was promoted to be a supervisor. Daniel’s ability to reveal and interpret a king’s dream brought favour of God’s promotion. The king decreed Daniel’s God is Only ONE TRUE LIVING GOD to be worshipped. Due to miracles seen of Daniel not being eaten in the lion’s den or burnt by fire Son of God Jesus joined them in. It is important to be humble in using whatever gifts of knowledge God gives us for His Glory in Jesus Name. I experienced visions in my dream where God showed me complex statistics and data about various constellations, space calculations I not know existed before my dream. God beamed these data onto the sky so I told God to wait for me to go get paper to write them down because it was too much for me to memorize all in my dream but I woke up. To my greatest surprise all God revealed in my dream was already online available on Google. I could not believe my eyes and I shared testimony many times. God is source of all knowledge so its good to give God all the Glory and thanks for talents helping accomplish good success in Jesus Name. The Holy Spirit brings to remembrance knowledge to recall what we learn or see in visions to testify the goodness of God. If struggling in any field of study seek God’s face for Mercy and Grace to receive knowledge, wisdom to achieve excellence. Akiane is a living example of God teaching her to paint by meditating in the presence of God to receive visions to draw. She is known all over the world as, “Girl Taught Art by God.” God’s gifts, talents, and skills are to enhance quality of life to bless mankind. Remember to thanks to God for protect the knowledge given you. Just as Father God is happy to see HIS Children success the devil wants to sabotage knowledge and the glory of mankind. The devil goes extra miles to pervert, destroy, ruin, counterfeit the real knowledge of God. Some destroyed by family strongholds that subdue the gifts and talents of God due to envy and jealousy. So it is good to be under God’s POWER to protect knowledge given you to flourish and thrive as God wants for you in Jesus Name. Cover yourself with BLOOD of Jesus and talk to your pastor as the young man in this video did to receive breakthrough in Jesus Name.

YOUTH BUSINESS GROWTH

IMG_20180410_065558The teenage entrepreneur Tommie Rose has become young ambassador for The National Enterprise Challenge (TNEC). The youngster, from Ordsall joins forces with former ‘Dragon’ Theo Paphitis who is supporting competition a second year in a row. The budding businessman Tommie, 15, became an M.E.N favourite when he raked in £14,000 from selling treats to students at Salford Buile Hill High School. He was also offered his job within hours of enterprising story going online. He puts his experience to good use as he champions inter-school competition sponsored by a stationary company Ryman. The challenge, a ‘real life’ business situation set by Theo and Rymans is divided into 2 age categories: Key Stage 3 (Year 7-8) and Key Stage 4 (Year 9-10). Tommie’s role is to deliver talks and workshops at schools entering competition to inspire them to work together and sharing with them his own success tips.Tommie with Ben, Michael Dyer, CEO and Co-Founders at Ryman National Enterprise. Since appearing in world renowned Forbes magazine, and having the backing of likes of Sir Alan Sugar, Tommie made a point of encouraging youthg to get involved in business and entrepreneurship. He said: “I think this opportunity fits really well together, I think what TNEC does is brilliant by motivating young people interested in business such as myself. “Importantly for me it highlights the fact that you do not need to be top of your class or necessarily academic high achiever to be good at enterprise I think I will be able to inspire so many young people as they will see themselves in me and more likely to take on board what I say as I am a young person achieving success.” And The National Enterprise Challenge aims to focus on developing skills in young people like; teamwork, leadership, communication and their presentation of ideas and projects. Each school that takes part in the challenge will send winning team of 6 pupils and 2 teachers to The National Finals to be held at Alton Towers in July. There are also awards for the most enterprising students, teachers and schools. This is good news to really help young people to encourage them in society to become savvy business people. Take a good look at how families and the schools channel energy of young people to be productive and more focussed on good ideas. This is a dedicated young entrepreneur who needed guidance to grow business idea. Good to know the business community understands his motivation and passion to help him establish his plans. This is a better option than idlying and bored so lured into mischief as some tend to do. It is good to support young people to be contributing to society in a good way to not be overburdened by debt without jobs for life. Cumbersome yoke of debt around young people’s neck is broken by Tommie Rose to earn money early in life and have good success.

 

SCHOOL OPENS OWN BANK

Pupils save over £100 in new school bank!

 

Ws4g3Students at Walthamstow School for Girls have thrown open the doors of their very own bank.

11-14 year olds have been trained by MyBnk to get fellow pupils into good financial habits by offering accounts and loans of up to £40. Using real money, their MyBnk-in-a-Box scheme opens once a week at lunchtime and is also accessible online.

“I opened an account today with £2 and I think it’s important to save so you don’t have to worry about your parents spending all of their money on you! I would like to buy things for myself and be independent”. Amy 12, young saver.

Ws4g2Also opening accounts on launch day were the Mayor of Waltham Forest, Saima Mahmud and our patron, broadcaster and campaigner, June Sarpong. Scores of young people deposited over £100 in a single lunch break.

The young bankers now will also run incentivised saving and enterprise start-up drives for their fellow pupils. This is backed up with financial education workshops covering everything from tax and pensions to student finance, supported by Prudential.

“At WSFG we believe that our girls should understand how banks work and understand how to manage their personal finances. We try to build in transferable and lifelong skills that they will use in their everyday lives, as well as ensuring that they achieve the very best academic achievements they can”. Marianna Philippou, Maths teacher, Walthamstow School for Girls.

 

Ws4gSoon, Walthamstow will be joined by another London school bank, run by young people for young people. Savers bank on average £3.64 a week, 59% of their pocket money, an adult would bank £295 a week on an a £26,000 salary!

“The sooner young people are familiar with banking, the better they can develop sound financial habits like saving and navigate the system. We’re going all out for a generation that will have to make smarter financial decisions and create their own opportunities”. MyBnk CEO & Founder Lily Lapenna.

If you are interested in running the MyBnk-in-a-Box financial education programme in your school, get in touch via info@mybnk.org or 0207 377 8770!

financial education