MANAGING AUTISM DAILY

815v8CYBCGL._SL1500_Autism can be managed to excel at the highest level of education on spectrum range as Temple Grandin, Ph.D. shows. Temple is a gifted animal scientist who designed one-third of all the livestock-handling facilities in USA. She lectures widely on the autism spectrum because Temple Grandin is an autistic woman who thinks, feels, experiences the world in ways incomprehensible to the rest. In her book, Grandin delivers the report on autism from dual perspectives of a scientist and autistic person sharing her experiences and how she managed to function in the world. What emerges in Thinking in Pictures is the document of an extraordinary woman bridging gulf of condition to shed light on a common issue familiar to many people. Oliver Sacks calls Temple Grandin’s book First picture of autism from the inside” quite extraordinary, unprecedented in a way unthinkable.” Sacks told part of her story in his words and in response in Thinking in Pictures Grandin returns to tell her life history with greater depth, insight and feeling. Grandin told Sacks, I don’t want my thoughts to die with me, wants to do something to know my life has meaning. I’m talking about things at the very core of my existence. Grandin’s clearly explains what it is like to “think in pictures” to broaden minds and bring clarity on a whole school of philosophy declaring language as an only necessary tool for expressing thought. So Grandin feels she can see through a cow’s eyes to influence the design of slaughter houses and livestock restraint systems. She has great insight in human animal relations. So would be good if Thinking in Pictures transforms similarly to study religious feelings to make the world better place.

Anyone who needs help in dealing with autism can get help through available sources including books, advice from GPs and experts. Grantin’s original book published her life as high-functioning autistic woman. Grandin wrote articles on her life and work as animal scientist in 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. Words of encouragement in support of her work is included here by those who found her books helpful. The Library Journal noted from her autobiography, emerged: Labeled Autistic (LJ 5/15/86), Grandin (animal studies, Colorado State Univ.) on how, high-functioning autistic adult overcame her disability to design livestock-handling equipment. Profiled in Oliver Sacks’s An Anthropologist on Mars (LJ 2/15/95), Grandin lectures on autism at meetings and conferences. Using insights from scientific studies, autobiographies by autistic adults, and her experiences explained how people with autism differently perceive and process visual sensory information and experience to express emotion, develop social skills. She reviews diagnosis and treatment of autism, and discusses its association with talent and genius. And in the book we learn of Grandin’s own strategies for coping with autism. How autism gives advantage to understand behavior of animals. This book is highly recommended for anyone interested in the subject. Published: Lucille Boone, San Jose P.L. Cal. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

A most remarkable woman, Grandin describes her deepest feelings while telling how she made herself a strong and valued individual. Autistic, she was helped by her mother, book’s dedicatee, and mentors who included high-school science teacher, a cattle-rancher aunt in Arizona, and a Swift meatpacking plant manager. Attacks of nerves and panic nearly overwhelmed her in her teens, but carefully selected and supervised drugs eased many of those problems. After earning a doctoral degree, she undertook her first work project, which was called the “Stairway to Heaven.” Instrumental for her in developing that and other methods for the humane treatment of food animals was her ability, determined in some measure by her autism, to think in pictures, her profound caring for the animals, and her engineering capabilities; fully one-third of U.S. facilities for handling hogs and cattle use her designs. Readers of Oliver Sacks’ Anthropologist from Mars, title article of about Grandin, will want to read Grandin’s own heartwarming real story. William Beatty

Online Reviews of the Book

“I hardly know what to say about this remarkable book. . . . It provides a way to understand many kinds of sentience, human and animal, that adorn the earth.” –Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, author of The Hidden Life of Dogs

“There are innumerable astounding facets to this remarkable book. . . . Displaying uncanny powers of observation . . . [Temple Grandin] charts the differences between her life and the lives of those who think in words.” –The Philadelphia Inquirer

“A uniquely fascinating view not just of autism but animal and human thinking and feeling, providing insights can only be called wisdom.” –Deborah Tannen, author of You Just Don’t Understand

“How does a true marvel let you know it has arrived? It’s hard to imagine an intellect as towering as Sacks’s coming up with perceptions rare completely out of left field as Grandin herself does in this mind-blowing book.” — Newsday

“Temple Grandin’s window onto the subjective experience of autism is of value to all of us who hope to gain a deeper understanding of the human mind by exploring the ways in which it responds to the world’s challenges.” — The Washington Times

“Temple Grandin, anthropologist from Mars, takes us on journey through her inner life and, with exquisite scientific detail offers us near photograph of the workings of her visual mind.” –John Ratey, coauthor of Driven to Distinction

“Temple Grandin’s legacy is invaluable gift of compassion. This is a journey of courage, determination, and, above all, worth. Society is the better for Temple Grandin having left her mark on it.” –Alex Pacheco, President, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

“Thinking in Pictures is beautiful book. Grandin has created a beautifully odd and fascinating picture of her life and mind, and her abiding love of animals.” — Elle

“A tireless researcher with a bionic memory and a superb education, no one can write with Temple’s authority because nobody knows as much as she does! This is an outstanding book that every parent and professional in the field of special needs will want to read, and general reader will acquire a new appreciation of autism, its liabilities, and its formidable assets.” –Annabel Stehli, author of The Sound of a Miracle

“Even Sacks’s fine writing about autism does not really compare to writing from within autism, because autism disorder of interiority. . . . Grandin has replaced the teleology of autobiography with something much closer to her heart: a diagram, in this case a diagram of her own mind.” –Voice Literary Supplement

From the Publisher

The captivating subject of Oliver Sack’s Anthropologist on Mars, is the Temple Grandin’s personal account of living with autism and extraordinary gift of animal empathy transformed her world and ours.

Temple Grandin renowned throughout the world as a designer of livestock holding equipment. Her unique empathy for animals has her to create systems which are humane and cruel free, setting the highest standards for the industry the treatment and handling of animals. She also happens to be autistic. Here, in Temple Grandin’s own words, is the story what it is like to live with autism. Temple is among the few people who have broken through many neurological impairments associated with autism. Throughout her life, she developed unique coping strategies, including famous “squeeze machine,” modeled after seeing the calming effect squeeze chutes on cattle. She describes pain, isolation growing up “different” and her discovery visual symbols to interpret “ways of the natives” Thinking In Pictures gives information from the frontlines of autism, including treatme medication, and diagnosis, as well as Temple’s insight into genius, savants, sensory phenomena, etc. It is Temple’s unique ability describe ways her visual mind works and how she first made her connection between impairment and the animal’s temperament understood extraordinary phenomenal way.

From the Inside Flap

Temple Grandin, Ph.D. is a gifted animal scientist who has designed one third of all livestock-handling facilities in the United States. She lectures widely on autism because she is autistic, a woman who thinks, feels, and experiences the world in ways incomprehensible to the rest of us. In this unprecedented book, Grandin writes from dual perspectives of a scientist and an autistic person. She tells us how she managed to breach the boundaries of autism to function in the outside world. What emerges is the document of an extraordinary human being, one who gracefully bridges the gulf between her condition and our own while shedding light on our common identity. “The innumerable astounding facets to this remarkable book displays the uncanny powers of observation of Temple Grandin charting the differences between her life and the lives of those who think in words.” Philadelphia Inquirer

About the Author

Temple Grandin has a Ph.D. in animal science from the University of Illinois and has designed one third of all the livestock-handling facilities in the United States, and many in other countries. She is currently an associate professor of animal sciences at Colorado State University and a frequent lecturer at autism meetings throughout country. She lives in Fort Collins, Colorado.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Thinking in Pictures Autism VisualsI THINK IN PICTURES. Words are like a second language to me. I translate both spoken and written words into full colour movies, complete with sound, which run like a VCR tape in my head. When somebody speaks to me, his words are instantly translated into pictures. Language-­based thinkers often find this phenomenon difficult to understand, but in my job as an equipment designer for the livestock industry, visual thinking is a tremendous advantage.

Visual thinking has enabled me to build entire systems in my imagination. During my career I have designed all kinds of equipment, ranging from corrals for handling cattle on ranches to systems for handling cattle and hogs during veterinary procedures and slaughter. I worked for many major livestock companies. In fact, one third of the cattle and hogs in the United States are handled in equipment I have designed. Some people I’ve worked for don’t even know their systems designed by someone with autism. I value my ability to think visually, and I would never want to lose it.

One of the most profound mysteries of autism has been the remarkable ability of most autistic people to excel at visual spatial skills while performing so poorly at verbal skills. When I was a child and a teenager, I thought everybody thought in pictures. I had no idea that my thought processes were different. In fact, I did not realize the full extent of the differences until very recently. At meetings and at work I started asking other people detailed questions about how they accessed information from their memories. From their answers I learned that my visualization skills far exceeded those of most other people.

I credit my visualization abilities with helping me understand the animals I work with. Early in my career I used a camera to help give me the animals’ perspective as they walked through a chute for their veterinary treatment. I would kneel down and take pictures through the chute from the cow’s eye level. Using the photos, I was able to figure out which things scared the cattle, such as shadows and bright spots of sunlight. Back then I used black-­and-­white film, because twenty years ago scientists believed that cattle lacked color vision. Today, research has shown that cattle can see colors, but the photos provided the unique advantage of seeing the world through a cow’s viewpoint. They helped me figure out why the animals refused to go in one chute but willingly walked through another.

Every design problem I’ve ever solved started with my ability to visualize and see the world in pictures. I started designing things as a child, when I was always experimenting with new kinds of kites and model airplanes. In elementary school I made a helicopter out of a broken balsa-­wood airplane. When I wound up the propeller, the helicopter flew straight up about a hundred feet. I also made bird-­shaped paper kites, which I flew behind my bike. The kites were cut out from a single sheet of heavy drawing paper and flown with thread. I experimented with different ways of bending the wings to increase flying performance. Bending the tips of the wings up made the kite fly higher. Thirty years later, this same design started appearing on commercial aircraft.

Now, in my work, before I attempt any construction, I test-­run the equipment in my imagination. I visualize my designs being used in every possible situation, with different sizes and breeds of cattle and in different weather conditions. Doing this enables me to correct mistakes prior to construction. Today, everyone is excited about the new virtual reality computer systems in which the user wears special goggles and is fully immersed in video game action. To me, these systems are like crude cartoons. My imagination works like the computer graphics programs that created the lifelike dinosaurs in Jurassic Park. When I do an equipment simulation in my imagination or work on an engineering problem, it is like seeing it on a videotape in my mind. I can view it from any angle, placing myself above or below the equipment and rotating it at the same time. I don’t need a fancy graphics program that can produce three-­dimensional design simulations. I can do it better and faster in my head.

I create new images all the time by taking many little parts of images I have in the video library in my imagination and piecing them together. I have video memories of every item I’ve ever worked with—steel gates, fences, latches, concrete walls, and so forth. To create new designs, I retrieve bits and pieces from my memory and combine them into a new whole. My design ability keeps improving as I add more visual images to my library. I add videolike images from either actual experiences or translations of written information into pictures. I can visualize the operation of such things as squeeze chutes, truck loading ramps, and all different types of livestock equipment. The more I actually work with cattle and operate equipment, the stronger my visual memories become.

I first used my video library in one of my early livestock design projects, creating a dip vat and cattle-­handling facility for John Wayne’s Red River feed yard in Arizona. A dip vat is a long, narrow, seven-­foot-­deep swimming pool through which cattle move in single file. It is filled with pesticide to rid the animals of ticks, lice, and other external parasites. In 1978, existing dip vat designs were very poor. The animals often panicked because they were forced to slide into the vat down a steep, slick concrete decline. They would refuse to jump into the vat, and sometimes they would flip over backward and drown. The engineers who designed the slide never thought about why the cattle became so frightened.

The first thing I did when I arrived at the feedlot was to put myself inside the cattle’s heads and look out through their eyes. Because their eyes are on the sides of their heads, cattle have wide-­angle vision, so it was like walking through the facility with a wide-­angle video camera. I had spent the past six years studying how cattle see their world and watching thousands move through different facilities all over Arizona, and it was immediately obvious to me why they were scared. Those cattle must have felt as if they were being forced to jump down an airplane escape slide into the ocean.

Cattle are frightened by high contrasts of light and dark as well as by people and objects that move suddenly. I’ve seen cattle that were handled in two identical facilities easily walk through one and balk in the other. The only difference between the two facilities was their orientation to the sun. The cattle refused to move through the chute where the sun cast harsh shadows across it. Until I made this observation, nobody in the feedlot industry had been able to explain why one veterinary facility worked better than the other. It was a matter of observing the small details that made a big difference. To me, the dip vat problem was even more obvious.

My first step in designing a better system was collecting all the published information on existing dip vats. Before doing anything else, I always check out what is considered state-­of-­the-­art so I don’t waste time reinventing the wheel. Then I turned to livestock publications, which usually have very limited information, and my library of video memories, all of which contained bad designs. From experience with other types of equipment, such as unloading ramps for trucks, I had learned that cattle willingly walk down a ramp that has cleats to provide secure, nonslip footing. Sliding causes them to panic and back up. The challenge was to design an entrance would encourage the cattle to walk in voluntarily and plunge into the water, which was deep enough to submerge them completely, so that all the bugs, including those that collect in their ears, would be eliminated.

I started running three-­dimensional visual simulations in my imagination. I experimented with different entrance designs and made cattle walk through them in my imagination. Three images merged to form final design: a memory of a dip vat in Yuma, Arizona, portable vat I had seen in a magazine, and an entrance ramp I had seen on a restraint device at the Swift meat-­packing plant in Tolleson, Arizona. The new dip vat entrance ramp was a modified version of the ramp I had seen there. My design contained three features that had never been used before: an entrance would not scare the animals, an improved chemical filtration system. And use of animal behavior principles to prevent the cattle from becoming overexcited when they left the vat.

The first thing I did was convert the ramp from steel to concrete. The final design had a concrete ramp on a twenty-­five-­degree downward angle. Deep grooves in the concrete provided secure footing. The ramp appeared to enter the water gradually, but in reality it abruptly dropped away below the water’s surface. The animals could not see the drop-­off because the dip chemicals colored the water. When they stepped out over the water, they quietly fell in, because their center of gravity had passed the point of no return.

Before the vat was built, I tested the entrance design many times in my imagination. Many of the cowboys at the feedlot were skeptical and did not believe my design would work. After it was constructed, they modified it behind my back, because they were sure it was wrong. A metal sheet was installed over the nonslip ramp, converting it back to an old-­fashioned slide entrance. The first day they used it, two cattle drowned because they panicked and flipped over backward.

When I saw the metal sheet, I made the cowboys take it out. They were flabbergasted when they saw that the ramp now worked perfectly. Each calf stepped out over the steep drop-­off and quietly plopped into the water. I fondly refer to this design as “cattle walking on water.”

Over the years, I have observed that many ranchers and cattle feeders think that the only way to induce animals to enter handling facilities is to force them in. The owners and managers of feedlots sometimes have a hard time comprehending that if devices such as dip vats and restraint chutes are properly designed, cattle will voluntarily enter them. I can imagine the sensations the animals would feel. If I had a calf’s body and hooves, I would be very scared to step on a slippery metal ramp.

There were still problems I had to resolve after the animals left the dip vat. The platform where they exit is usually divided into two pens so that cattle can dry on one side while the other side is being filled. No one understood why the animals coming out of the dip vat would sometimes become excited, but I figured it was because they wanted to follow their drier buddies, not unlike children divided from their classmates on a playground. I installed a solid fence between the two pens to prevent the animals on one side from seeing the animals on the other side. It was a very simple solution, and it amazed me that nobody had ever thought of it before.

The system I designed for filtering and cleaning the cattle hair and other gook out of the dip vat was based on a swimming pool filtration system. My imagination scanned two specific swimming pool filters that I had operated, one on my Aunt Brecheen’s ranch in Arizona and one at our home. To prevent water from splashing out of the dip vat, I copied the concrete coping overhang used on swimming pools. That idea, like many of my best designs, came to me very clearly just before I drifted off to sleep at night.

Being autistic, I don’t naturally assimilate information that most people take for granted. Instead, I store information in my head as if it were on a CD-­ROM disc. When I recall something I have learned, I replay the video in my imagination. The videos in my memory are always specific; for example, I remember ­handling cattle at the veterinary chute at Producer’s Feedlot or McElhaney Cattle Company. I remember exactly how the animals behaved in that specific situation and how the chutes and other equipment were built. The exact construction of steel fence­posts and pipe rails in each case is also part of my visual memory. I can run these images over and over and study them to solve design problems.

If I let my mind wander, the video jumps in a kind of free association from fence construction to a particular welding shop where I’ve seen posts being cut and Old John, the welder, making gates. If I continue thinking about Old John welding a gate, the video image changes to a series of short scenes of building gates on several projects I’ve worked on. Each video memory triggers another in this associative fashion, and my daydreams may wander far from the design problem. The next image may be of having a good time listening to John and the construction crew tell war stories, such as the time the backhoe dug into a nest of rattle­snakes and the machine was abandoned for two weeks because everybody was afraid to go near it.

This process of association is a good example of how my mind can wander off the subject. People with more severe autism have difficulty stopping endless associations. I am able to stop them and get my mind back on track. When I find my mind wandering too far away from a design problem I am trying to solve, I just tell myself to get back to the problem. Interviews with autistic adults who have good speech and are able to articulate their thought processes indicate that most of them also think in visual images. More severely impaired people, who can speak but are unable to explain how they think, have highly associational thought patterns. Charles Hart, the author of Without Reason, a book about his autistic son and brother, sums up his son’s thinking in one sentence: “Ted’s thought processes aren’t logical, they’re associational.” This explains Ted’s statement “I’m not afraid of planes. That’s why they fly so high.” In his mind, planes fly high because he is not afraid of them; he combines two pieces of information, that planes fly high and that he is not afraid of heights.

Another indicator of visual thinking as the primary method of processing information is the remarkable ability many autistic people exhibit in solving jigsaw puzzles, finding their way around a city, or memorizing enormous amounts of information at a glance. My own thought patterns are similar to those described by A. R. Luria in The Mind of a Mnemonist. This book describes a man who worked as a newspaper reporter and could perform amazing feats of memory. Like me, the mnemonist had a visual image for everything he had heard or read. Luria writes, “For when he heard or read a word, it was at once converted into a visual image corresponding with the object the word signified for him.” The great inventor Nikola Tesla was also a visual thinker. When he designed electric turbines for power generation, he built each turbine in his head. He operated it in his imagination and corrected faults. He said it did not matter whether the turbine was tested in his thoughts or in his shop; the results would be the same.

Early in my career I got into fights with other engineers at meat-­packing plants. I ­couldn’t imagine that they could be so stupid as not to see the mistakes on the drawing before the equipment was installed. Now I realize it was not stupidity but a lack of visualization skills. They literally could not see. I was fired from one company that manufactured meat-­packing plant equipment because I fought with the engineers over a design which eventually caused the collapse of an overhead track that moved 1,200-­pound beef carcasses from end of conveyor. As each carcass came off the conveyor, it dropped about three feet before it was abruptly halted by a chain attached to a trolley on overhead track. The first time the machine was run, the track was pulled out of the ceiling. The employees fixed it bolting it securely and installing additional brackets. This solved problem temporarily, because the force of the carcasses jerking the chains was so great. Strengthening the overhead track was treating a symptom of the problem rather than its cause. I tried to warn them. It was like bending a paper clip back and forth too many times. After a while it breaks.

Amazon.com Review

The line between autism and genius is a well known factor in history. As many great and accomplished achievers in the fields of life ranging from the academics in education, creative personalities and maestro musicians among others have level of autism. An important factor is to identify the specific talents, interests, abilities and needs of a child. As Temple demonstrates her ingenuity plus a good support network of family, teachers an aunt with a farm among many made it possible to achieve her best interests. So a verbal word oriented society designed to function mostly on verbal ability to read and write exams is justice being done to autistic children. School system is based on use of words in a preferred language so what mechanism is in place ensures nonverbal visual measurement of talent and skills. Is it fair to insist one size fits all education compares autistic children in the classroom to gifted or a usual average child.

Top reviews

5 stars reviews was a fascinating read. I especially liked the first half when she talked about her childhood, memories and how she came to learn things. It’s very helpful in…

 

5.0 out of 5 stars You know when you read something and you become agitated because somebody says something to which you can relate strongly and you neither ever had defined or quite understood…

 

2.0 out of 5 stars This one was random. Parts were helpful, but there are large portions talk about life at slaughter house I had a hard time correlating. I’d recommend a different…

 

5.0 out of 5 stars I’m a high functioning autistic and I loved this movie. Parts of it spoke to me so loudly, like the kids bullying her, calling her freak, or her telling strangers trying to…

 

5.0 out of 5 stars This book provides insights into the mind of a person in the autism spectrum that is invaluable for the parent and the teacher. What this books brings is an insider’s view. I…

 

5.0 out of 5 stars Most of us know very little about communication with animals, and this heart-warming book tells it all. The book also opens up an understanding

of the thinking of…

 

5.0 out of 5 stars Temple Gradin is simply fascinating. How she has trained her mind to work is amazing and has provided irreplaceable knowledge for me when working with our special student…

 

5.0 out of 5 stars I am making a special point of writing this while I am still reading it because I am concerned that it will be too easily dismissed by potential readers. I almost did not…

Autism Meltdowns

Many autistic people will experience meltdowns. The public ofinds it hard to tell the difference between an autism meltdown and temper tantrums, but they are different things. You can help by understanding autism, the person and what to do if you see someone having a meltdown. If your family member or the person you support has meltdowns, find out how to anticipate them, identify causes, and minimise their frequency.

What is a meltdown?

A meltdown is ‘an intense response to overwhelming situations’. It happens when someone becomes completely overwhelmed by their current situation and temporarily loses behavioural control.  This loss of control can be expressed verbally (eg shouting, screaming, crying), physically(eg kicking, lashing out, biting) or in both ways.

Autism meltdowns are not the same as temper tantrums

A meltdown is not the same as a temper tantrum. It is not bad of naughty behaviour and should not be considered as such. When a person is completely overwhelmed, and their condition means it is difficult to express that in appropriate way, it is understandable that the result is a meltdown.

Meltdowns are not the only way a person with autism may express feeling overwhelmed.  Other behaviours that may appear are less explosive but are equally common, such as refusing to interact, withdrawing from situations they find challenging, or avoiding them altogether.

What to do

If someone is having a meltdown, or not responding to you, don’t judge them. It can make a world of difference to someone with autism and their carers.

  • Give them some time – it can take a while to recover from an information or sensory overload.
  • Calmly ask them (or their parent or friend) if they’re OK, but bear in mind they’ll need more time to respond than you might expect.
  • Make space – try to create a quiet, safe space as best you can. Ask people to move along and not to stare, turn off loud music and turn down bright lights – whatever you can think of to reduce the information overload, try it.

Anticipating a meltdown

Many autistic people will show signs of distress before having a meltdown, which is sometimes referred to as the “rumble stage”. They may start to exhibit signs of anxiety such as pacing, seek reassurance through repetitive questioning or physical signs such as rocking or becoming very still. At this stage, there may still be a chance to prevent a meltdown. Strategies to consider include distraction, diversion, helping the person use calming strategies such as fiddle toys or listening to music, removing any potential triggers, and staying calm yourself.

Identifying the causes

A meltdown is a reaction to an overwhelming experience. If your family member or the person you support has meltdowns, identify what is overwhelming for them. Complete a diary over a period of time. Record what happened before, during and after each meltdown. Patterns may emerge. You may find that meltdowns occur at particular times, in particular places, or when something particular has happened.

Minimising triggers

Once you have a clearer idea what may be triggering meltdowns, think about ways you might minimise that trigger. Everyone with autism is different, but sensory differences,changes in routine, anxiety, and communication difficulties are common triggers.

Sensory considerations

Many autistic people have sensory differences. They may be over-sensitive to some senses, under-sensitive to others and often a combination of both.

For example, for someone who is over-sensitive to touch and sound, people brushing past them and a loud announcement at a train station could cause pain and sensory overload, leading to a meltdown. In this situation, it could be helpful to listen to calming music on headphones to block out loud noises and wait until everyone has got off train before approaching platform to avoid crowds of people. Other situations to consider include creating low arousal environment (eg remove bright lights, soundproof walls) or using sensory equipment (eg glasses with dark or coloured lenses, ear defenders, a weighted blanket).

Change in routine

Consistent, predictable routines and structure are very important for autistic people and a change to routine can be very distressing. For example, the panic caused by needing to drive a different route to school due to roadworks could trigger a meltdown. In this example, a clear visual support explaining change, reassurance that the rest of the routine remains the same and adding extra support such calming/ comforting activity to do in the car could help. For an unexpected change, there can be a particular plan in place, such as the use of a picture symbol to explain the change, reinforcement of the rest of the day being the same (if that’s the case), a chance to express any frustration appropriately (such as hitting a pillow, ripping paper) followed by an activity that is known to calm the person such as taking deep breaths, listening to calming music, going for a walk, or squeezing a stress ball. It may help to increase structure around ordinary transitions, helping the person to navigate the change from one activity to another throughout the day. Using a clear timetable explaining when the transitions will be, using timers to countdown to transitions, using a favourite toy or character to be part of the transition, can all help.

Anxiety

With unwritten rules and unpredictable nature, the world can be an extremely challenging environment for autistic people and many experience anxiety. If a person does not have tools to calm down when anxious, they may have a meltdown. Develop strategies to manage anxiety, such as introducing our Brain in Hand app. Have a plan beforehand of what to do if the person feels anxious, such as a calming play list to listen to at the shops or a stress ball in their pocket. Build relaxation time into the routine. The person will generally feel calmer and better able to cope when something that could trigger a meltdown, occurs. What it means varies from person to person, and may consist of quiet activities, eg taking a walk, listening to music, and reading, doing puzzles, using fiddle toys, or more strenuous activities, eg jumping on a trampoline, going to the gym, playing a computer game. In the case of strenuous activities, observe if the activity really does calm the person down. If it doesn’t, but is just an activity they really enjoy, still build in time for that activity but try to find an activity that genuinely calms them and make time to use it well.

Communication difficulties

Autistic people can find it difficult to express their wants and needs, from a non-verbal child struggling to express need for a drink to a teenager finding it hard to express their emotions. This can result in overwhelming feelings, such as anger and frustration, leading to a meltdown. Support the person to find ways to understand and express their emotions appropriately before they get overwhelmed, and find ways to make your own communication more easily understandable. Verbal communication is challenging for autistic people due to potential misunderstanding of the body language, tone of voice, irony, sarcasm.

Things you can try include:

More from our charity

Further information please contact:

Autism Helpline 

Tel: 0808 800 4104
(open 10am-4pm, Monday-Thursday, 9am-3pm on Fridays)
Text: 07903 200 200
(to request information packsonly)
Email enquiry service:  visitwww.autism.org.uk/enquiry
and complete the online form

The Autism Helpline provides impartial, confidential information, advice and support for autistic people and their families.

Miracle Cure for autism

Levin doesn’t call this particular cure a silver bullet for autism: There is no silver bullet, no one-size-fits-all approach. Rather, she credits his transformation to a number of things, including a home based and child centered social-relational program called the Son-Rise Program.

Susan Levin, pictured above with son Ben, documents her family’s journey in her memoir “Unlocked: A Family Emerging from the Shadows of Autism.”Tim Daley

But one of the biggest factors was what was on his plate. “Hippocrates was right when he advised, ‘Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food,’ ” she says. Levin is part of a growing group of people who are paying more attention to diet, organic, gluten- and casein-free among them, as a way to treat the symptoms of autism and other disorders. So strongly does she believe in the healing possibilities of food that she’s now a family wellness coach working exclusively with families of autistic children. While the scientific verdict is still out on diet as a cure, statistics point to a definite link between gastrointestinal issues and autism. A 2012 study published by the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology found a direct link between GI issues and behavior. 70 percent of children with autism have gastrointestinal issues during childhood or adolescence, food sensitivity, diarrhoea and constipation can cause extreme discomfort, leading to irritability, and erratic or withdrawn behaviour. But not everyone convinced.

“Over the years I’ve been privy to a million parents, a million cures,” says Andrew Baumann, president and CEO of New York Families for Autistic Children. “Parents are willing to try just about anything.” And while he concedes that diet can have a very positive effect, he just doesn’t see it as a cure for autism: “You can’t cure something [when] you don’t know what the cause is.”

Parents are willing to try just about anything. You can’t cure something [when] you don’t know what the cause is.

 – Andrew Baumann, president and CEO of<br /> New York Families for Autistic Children

Kathleen DiChiara begs to differ. The former Fortune 500 executive was diagnosed with sudden onset neuropathy, which left her unable to walk. When the doctors told her there was little to be done, she went back to school to study. She’s now a nutrition educator, chef and speaker who credits an all-organic diet for healing not only herself, but her 11- year-old son, Steven, who’d been diagnosed as autistic but is no longer considered to be.

Why are people resistant to the idea of food’s effect on illness?

“It’s socially inconvenient,” DiChiara says. “They’re already struggling, and the idea of removing things from the diet is so daunting. But it’s the difference between the children who get well and the ones who don’t.”

Maria Rickert Hong, author of “Almost Autism: Recovering Children From Sensory Processing Disorder,” credits a gluten-free, dairy-free diet with the recovery of her two children from sensory-processing disorder.

“In a child with neurodevelopment disorders, the brain is inflamed, and the gut and the brain are connected,” Hong says. “Most of these kids have gut dysbiosis — an imbalance of good versus bad bacteria, like having too many weeds in your garden. When you have that, the body’s immune system is off.”

Levin and her family initially started Ben on a gluten-free and casein-free diet, later eliminating soy, corn, potatoes and rice. But as soon as one offending food was removed, she says, a reaction to another popped up.

Then they tried the Body Ecology Diet, an anti-yeast diet high in grain-like seeds such as amaranth, quinoa, millet and buckwheat. Almost overnight, Ben calmed down and started making eye contact.

Now 12, Ben is studying for his bar mitzvah. Eight years after that chilling diagnosis, he’s become more empathetic, frequently saying “I love you” to his mother, his father and sister.

Levin says his newfound compassion is nothing short of a miracle.

“It doesn’t matter what people say,” says Levin. “I have my kid back.”

 

Advertisements

CYBERCONDRIAC & ZOMBIES

internet-medicine

Cyberchondria” is fuelling the epidemic health anxiety of people as 1/5 NHS appointments is hypochondriacs and those with irrational fears, experts have warned. Researchers from Imperial College London said internet searching and use of fitness trackers is heaping pressures on busy hospital clinics. The Health anxiety is estimated to cost NHS more than £420 million each year in outpatient appointments alone, with millions more spent on needless tests and scans, they warned. Instead, such cases should be offered a course of counselling, psychiatrists said, following a five-year study of patients treated in five English hospitals. Researchers said the internet was feeding a “silent epidemic” of health anxiety, where harmless ailments could be mistaken for terrifying diagnoses. And they said the growth of fitness trackers was likely to increase levels of hypochondria, heaping pressures on cardiac clinics and neurology units.8112295_f520

Dr Helen Tyrer, a senior clinical research fellow at Imperial College London, said the anxiety was often triggered by an event, such as the patient suffering a health scare, somebody in their family getting ill or dying, or a celebrity their age dying or getting sick. The internet is fuelling unnecessary health scares as they are convinced they have or are developing a serious underlying disease, or that an existing medical problem is much more serious than it is,” she said. “The belief is held despite all medical evidence to the contrary.” Lead author Professor Peter Tyrer said the internet appeared to be fuelling the trend: “We suspect it is increasing in frequency because of this cyberchondria,” he said. “People now go to their GPs with a whole list of things they’ve looked up on the internet and say ‘what do you make of this?’, and the poor GP, five minutes into consultation, has 4 pages of reading to do. Although, 

“Dr Google is informative it does not put things in the right proportion,” he said.

The study, funded by National Institute for Health Research tracked 444 patient with severe health anxiety at cardiology gastroenterology, neurology respiratory departments. Some had genuine health complaints, or had suffered from them in the past but all had abnormal levels of anxiety. Those given the cognitive behavioural therapy saw a significant drop in anxiety levels five years on with similar death rates to those given the standard NHS care counselling led to discovering life-threatening illnesses researchers found.How are smartphones affecting teenagers?

Furthermore, young people obsessed by using smartphones are also affected as teenagers without Frontal Cortex Brain. This generation who spent their entire childhood and adolescence with USD of computers or smartphones feel effects, including negative impacts on mental health, says author Jean Twenge. Both children and parents can cut down on endless addictive use of computers ny ceasing the plug for starters, allowing supervised use within specified times including the smartphones and TV. A whole generation defines their identity by social media damaging family life, communication or socializing life skills. Many look Dow 24/7 without any breaks so affecting their sleep and mind throughout the day into the early hours of the morning. Many sleep less than 6 hours and function on clouded fogged heads we without clarity of thought or spatial awareness to adapt in dynamic here and the now moments of life. This ‘victims of technology’ success cannot blame their additive cybercondriac’s inadvertent lifestyle creation as addicts on computer gadgets, phones constantly monitored due to obsessive fear of their missing messages. And so people are too busy online in fear of missing messages that some put their lives at risk. Many lost lives not paying attention on the roads or when crossing traffic lights so endangered themselves and motorists. Now extreme measures are taken to endure safety on pavement light guides for ‘smartphone zombies.’

Pavement lights have been installed at a pedestrian crossing in a Netherlands town to help smartphone users cross the road safely. The light strips designed to catch the eye of people looking down at their device changes colour to match traffic signals. The lure of games and social media has come “at the expense of attention to traffic”, said councillor Kees Oskam. Dutch road safety group VVN said idea “rewards bad behaviour.” It is not a good idea to help such mobile phone users look at their phones,” said Jose de Jong of VVN, the Dutch Traffic Safety Association. We do not want such people to use phones when dealing with traffic, even when walking around. The people must always look around them, to check if cars are actually stopping at the red signals.” The lights have been installed on a trial basis at one crossing, close to 3 schools in Bodegraven. The company that developed the technology says it hopes to offer the strips to other towns in the future. Similar pavement lights are being tested in German city of Augsburg to help so-called “smartphone zombies” navigate level crossings.Feet on a street

Few play outdoor sports or engage in any physical activities unless gadget oriented therefore impacts their health and emotional well-being. This curious evolution in technology affects lifestyle connections, collaborating, awareness, appreciation of natural environment. Is replaced by downward spiral of looking down without switching off smartphone to look up at natural beautiful world. So overwhelms human mind by too much information cluttering though process. It causes unnecessary anxiety and panic attacks seen in some people. Teenagers with diets lacking in fatty acids become anxious adults. Omega-3 deficiency is widely recognised as a major risk factor associated with such neuropsychiatric conditions as depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Existing research has consistently shown the importance of good omega-3 status during critical development periods of perinatal and adolescent life stages. According to new research imbalances in adolescence may have long term implications for emotional well-being and cognitive functions said co- lead author of study concluding: “Omega-3 PUFAs dietary deficiency during adolescence and in childhood found strong increases in anxiety and anhedonia which lead to decreases in specific cognitive functions in adulthood.” Adolescence is important time in development. The structure and function of brain changes most during adolescence, meaning it is important for individuals this age to maintain healthy diet. However it tends to be time when exact opposite happens. Independence means they start making their own food choices and as a result skip nutritious options in favour of easily accessible convenience foods typically lacking in nutrients, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Diet is critical as fact omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through food. The study involved latest research conducted by a multi-institutional French research team with result published in Journal of Neuroscience. diets-lacking-in-fatty-acids-may-become-anxiousThis subject requires teens cut down sugar intake and junk food so human’s genetic make-up impact of nutrients must be taught more in schools to help educate pupils and parents from the early years. It must be a general study course for knowledge and awareness throughout life. The damage caused by lack of these nutrients is irreparable so must be taken seriously. A balanced diet meal is essential especially in the early years and adolescence at which point diet requirements need omega-3 fatty acids most. Glamorous poor diet during adolescence reduces levels of nutrient in prefrontal cortex region important in regulating emotions risks, consequences nucleus accumbens primarily involved in addiction. It explains why addictive behaviour is most prevalent in teenage years. The low-quality diet weakens connections between neurons in these regions, impairing brain development and resulting in observed emotional and cognitive changes. Research result supports earlier research of long-term consequences of the poor nutrition in adolescence and importance of making sure food choices contains the nutrients essential for brain health. Breakfast is key for parents to ensure kids are well nourished in the morning and given vitamins to supplement foods eaten. To eat more fresh greens and vegetables everyday enhances brain performance.

How to cope with anxiety

Dr Rachel Andrew offers her advice for teens struggling with anxiety:

  • Seek appropriate help if you feel you need it
  • Remind yourself that it only forms a part of your strengths, talents and abilities
  • Try and practise mindfulness to stay in the moment, as your anxiety will drive you to constantly think of the future and worst case scenarios
  • Try to stay focused on the present and more manageable situations
  • Take a break on social media or at least have moments in the day where you switch alerts off

HOLY KISS GREETING & HUGS

article-2071835-0F1BBF8E00000578-716_634x422In Romans 16:16 in the Bible Paul wrote in New Testament commanding believers to make contact or touch others with a warm smile, hand-clasp and a friendly hug. Paul encouraged the congregation and church members to give each other a hug, a touch as a sign of unity to greet each other with a holy kiss and hugs. And speak through the Psalms as people quote Shakespeare to share favourite lines in literature. The Pentecostals often greet each other with kisses and hugs. Visitors are welcomed this way so if the new members are not used to such a way of greeting they can feel innaudated and intimidated by the zealous members embracing or kissing them if not used to an intimate way of expressing agape love. Recently, in the church a female pastor rushed towards a new male visitor and proceeded to try to hug him as she does for many years. But the new member raised both his hands to indicate, ‘do not touch me or come too close.’ It surprised everyone as it had never happened before. Maybe others out of politeness and courtesy tolerate it or probably just go along with kisses or hugs, but no one ever rejected it before. It is perfectly understable if some people feel uncomfortable and say no, it does not mean rejection of the one expressing such Biblical principles. On other occasions, for security reasons, important leaders are not allowed to be touched or hugged under any circumstances. Of course that scenario can happen in church gatherings so if not sure, ask if it is alright to do so. 22CULTURALSTUDIES1-jumbo.jpgIn some places female to female hugs and kisses are preferred or handshakes encouraged. But the woman must first extend her hand to a man because the man is not allowed to shake a married women’s hands in some cultures. On the other hand there are countries that see kiss or hugs as prerogative of diplomacy so must be done. In some churches women are only allowed to kiss and hug other women as men kiss and hug the men. In an age of legal homosexuality, lesbian partnerships or marriages the churches in favour has no problems or prefer handshakes. However is common in the workplace to encourage hugging for bonding and a sense of belonging. But how about those people in the offices who do not like to be kissed or bugged publicly at least at awkward moments. You are greeting someone or saying goodbye. Should you give that person a hug? Especially if it’s someone you don’t know well? You do not want to seem intrusive if you hug too soon, but you don’t want to appear overly stiff or too formal so you offer a handshake when a hug is expected. So what should you do? There a few good rules about hugging in our society.article-2148121-133B0FA3000005DC-582_468x309On one hand, Americans are famously informal and forthright. On the other hand, our nation has puritan roots so we are known for needing more personal space than other cultures. How do you strike a balance? Here are some guidelines to start from, many of which come from etiquette expert Jacqueline Whitmore, author of Poised for Success.

1. Mind body language.

With hugs, as with kisses, another person’s body language will tell you whether he or she is willing to accept a hug or not. Before you go in for that squeeze, pay attention to what the person’s position, movement, and facial expression is telling you. Are the feet pointed toward you or away? Is the person leaning in, or distancing him or herself? What does your gut feeling tell you this person wants? When people offend others with a hug, it’s most often because they just barge right in and don’t stop to get a read on what other person wants. Don’t make that mistake. Children are now being taught to meet and greet properly to learn etiquette. t1larg (1).jpg

2. Ask Permission First.

If you want to hug someone, you think it welcomes you if not sure just ask. “May I give you a hug question indicates both affection, respect so likely appreciated. The only down side to this if people feel embarrassed or uncomfortable saying no. So if getting a negative or uncertain vibe do not even asking the question.

3. The Balance of Power.

A boss hugging an employee is a very different matter from two business associates hugging at the conclusion of a meeting. Be extra reserved about hugging if it can in any way seem like you’re using your power to disrespect another person’s boundaries. This is one reason Joe Biden recently drew so many criticisms for his putting his hands on  a cabinet member’s wife during swearing in ceremony.

4. Consider the occasion.

If you haven’t seen a colleague in a long time, or you’ve just gone through a powerful training or other experience together, or you’re at acelebration, then hugging might well be appropriate. The same may apply if the person in question has just had a piece of very good, or very bad news, or is struggling to deal with a difficult situation. On the other hand, if you routinely see this person and nothing special is going on, then a hug probably isn’t warranted.LXNGDEDJXOCNTOWYIIGFSDIU

5. Avoid mixing hug & non hugs.

You’re greeting a group of people, some of whom you know well and others whom you know only slightly or have just met. Do you hug some but not others? No, Whitmore advises. Shake hands with everyone to be consistent avoid making some feel uncomfortable or left out.

6. Keep it short.

A hug can go from natural to awkward if you keep it going for too long. So make your hugs brief. Whitmore recommends a duration of no more than three seconds.

7. Don’t hug if contagious

The last thing you want to do is give your colleague a cold, or catch one from him or her. So if you’re uncertain about your own health, or the other person seems to be fighting an infection, stick to a handshake at most, although not touching at all is probably safest. You can always say that you’re avoiding touch out of concern that you might spread something you’ve been exposed to if you are really afraid of catching something from other person.kissing-in-costa-rica-2

8. Don’t hug if not clean.

Let’s say you’re meeting on a very hot day, and you’ve gotten sweaty on your walk over from the parking lot. Or you’ve had a workout and returned to work but didn’t have time to shower. Or you’ve been out at a site visit and gotten grimy. In those circumstances, avoid hugging. The last thing you want to do is gross someone out.

9. Err on not hugging.

If you’re not sure whether a hug would be welcome, and you don’t think it’s a good idea to ask, then don’t hug. You’ll almost never offend someone with a handshake.

10. Cease the right moment.

In spite of all these caveats, I’m still a believer in the power of human contact. So if you feel like a hug is warranted and none of the obstacles above apply, I say go for it. I once met a business contact face-to-face for the first time after we’d been working together for several years. I felt like I knew him, and he seemed to feel the same, because at our first meeting, he greeted me with a hug. I was surprised, but happily so. During that brief meeting we talked more about our lives than about business and by the time I left, I had a human relationship to go with the emails and voice on the phone. That hug was a great way to start.

DON’T ADD TO/DELETE BIBLE

IMG_20170509_094533.jpgRevelations 22:19 says if anyone adds to the words of God or deletes taking away from the words of God it is sin God will reprove and deal with that person. Be a Berean and Study the Bible yourself and compare original texts to note changes in meaning. Deuteronomy 4:2 says do not add to or subtract God’s Commands so keep the Commands LORD God gives you. Consequences for tampering with the Word of God either adding, deleting or substrating from Bible is warned by God Who said HE WILL remove names of those who do from HIS Book of Life. The Shakespearean English translation of Bible modernised must remain true to original meaning of God. Salvation depends on Christ’s finished work on Cross so people have to abide by God’s Standards. Effort to make Bible easier to read must not destroy Central Message of the Gospel. Christ is Word made flesh Who dwelt amongs us on earth to save by Sovereign God’s Words directing us on Godpath of life for eternal salvation.hebrew-context-of-galatians-41-728.jpgWe had Bible study group meeting some time ago, taking turns to read out loud the Scriptures for particular day. A few people could not follow text and kept on asking for verses referred to. We took a look at their Bible and surprised their texts varied from ours. This happened many years ago when we realised these subtles changes, especially if you once memorised Bible verses growing up like the King James Bibles then words sound different in meaning. Those who feast on God’s Words readily notice changes. God’s Words energises to feed, protect and incapsulate you. When you revise prayer affirmations daily, at first you will not know anxiety and doubt creep in from negative misformation. So after two weeks saying praying affirmations, you will know Scripture by heart as the word daily protects you and shields you from fear and doubt. feast-on-gods-wordDo do not panic for Word of God says everybody must know word themselves. There is no second-hand faith so you have to know God’s Words yourself to save you. We noticed some Bible texts completely disappeared and today we received important message reinforcing changes taking place in Bible as follows: “A VERY CRITICAL ALERT!!! says, Hello beloved saints, I am sure you know new international version (NIV), published by Zondervan is now owned by Harper Collins who publishes Satanic Bible and The Joy of Gay Sex. NIV and the English Standard Version (ESV) removed 64,575 words from Bible including Jehovah Calvary, Holy Ghost, Omnipotent a few named. Bible renews and transforms a life held in darkness to be translated to Kingdom of Glorious Gospel of Light. It is how the strongholds are broken and people set free to serve Almighty God. KJV_Matthew_24-24The opportunity to receive God’s Words is beset with opposer contenders trying to stop gladiators from winning games. Spiritual warfare tactics is used by the devil’s false Christ’s and false prophets, showing great signs, wonders to deceive itching ears. So those not well versed in word of God are deceived including the very elect as Jesus warned. The NIV, ESV has removed 45 complete verses. Most Bibles device on phones e.g OLIVE TREE BIBLE STUDY APP. Try to find following scriptures in NIV and ESV on computer, phone, device right now if in doubt: Matthew 17:21, 18:11, 23:14; Mark 7:16, 9:44, 9:46; Luke 17:36, 23:17; John 5:4; Acts 8:37 you will not believe your eyes. Refuse to be blinded by satan and do not act like you do not care. Let us remember what Lord Jesus said in John 10:10 (King James Version). These attempts are to lure and deceive people into false security of their messages but God does not approve manipulations by people bending texts to suit themselves.beware-of-faith-based-on-feelings-rather-than-gods-wordTHE SOLUTION If you must use NIV and ESV, BUY and KEEP EARLIER VERSION OF the BIBLE. A Hard Copy cannot be updated. The changes occur when they ask you to update app. on your phone or laptop etc. Buy and KEEP EARLIER VERSIONS AND STORE THEM. There is a crusade geared towards altering Bible as we know it; NIV, ESV and many more versions are affected. We are living in the last days and Jesus is Coming Soon as the Gospel is preached everywhere all the prophecies being fulfilled. The devil is working hard to try to occupy Christians with things of the world so Jesus Coming will catch them unawares. Those who reject God texts reprint own versions to suit their interpretations to seem as if Bible said so. Be sure read to original versions especially New King James changed from Shakespeare era.e9ae378a96912ce06a61f66053e47c09Please prepared there is no more time to waste. And take advantage of sms, WhatsApp, BBM, Facebook, twitter etc to send this message to all your contact. Do not ignore this source of evangelism reaching dying souls to save and rescue the perishing. God be with you always and bless you for doing His Command! This confirms what we realised many years ago as God says My people perish for lack of knowledge. The Bible says God’s Truth you know sets you free and faith comes by hearing word of God. So the church that used to cry and repent for sin, after hearing the word of God, today compromises by defending sin of changing Bible texts to suit the church. revelation-22-vs-18-19bowl-1-webedc8377f4d945edcabd547c737e12f13af1385821bbc43cffd5b7246f948ee46Accurate knowledge is so essential like Bereans to study to know the word of God to impact lives. If a person does not know the words of God they assume it opinions of man imposed on them. So reading Bible in context helps to learn to understand God better. The Bible also has many verses in different places to emphasise God’s Words for repetition to reinforce the message. Jesus answered the  devil from the Word of by saying it is written you must not tempt the LORD your God. So do not twist God’s Words to suit intentions against God’s Words to mislead people, often baby Christians in search of God’s Love. Use faith building Bible encouraging you and leading you to God not distorted versions promoting rebellion against God. They often look for error to justify the Bible is not worth believing to lure you from salvation in Christ. The word of God is Sacred Texts written in the Bible through Holy Spirit according to Timothy 3:16- 17;5:1-2 says The Bible is necessary to teach, reproof, for correction, training in righteousness for all believers not just men of God. To be able to answer Biblically from texts as God’s manual for life equips by the Word of God. The WORD of God is Alive and is sharper than a two-edged sword cutting through bones and narrow to perform changes in hearts and minds of people. Hebrews-4-2-The-Word-Is-Living-and-Active-red-copy1.jpgThis is why devil fights hard to prevent gaining knowledge from Bible because it is greatest weapon that defeats satan in the name of Jesus. Whole generations are kept ignorant from powerful words of God that gives perfect peace beyond human understanding. So to overcome adversary, Word of God must be stored in your heart and your mind to actively recall from memory to replay moment by moment, to feed your soul for hope, assurance and confidence in God. This chaotic world is a man-made version so God will restore His Kingdom for all His Children in Jesus Name. The Word of God is the Lamp to your feet and Light to your path driving away darkness. So knowing the Bible is protection armour that keeps you strong in faith not to be deceived. Jesus said in Matthew 24:24 that the very elect, if not careful can be deceived and misled by the devil. The Bible is a living word so people become living sermons to Glorify God.

THE MIRACLE GIFT OF ADAM

Emilie Larter and Adam

Emilie’s journey started in September 2014 when the charity volunteering for in Uganda received a call about the new born boy in need. Baby arrived after the burial of a woman who died because of excessive bleeding after birth. So Adam was her child including 6 others yet had not received any breast milk or formula and no one able to care for him. Sadly, his biological mother left this world before even giving him a name,” said Emilie. All took to Adam with random acts of kindness in and she became the little one’s sole carer. And the sleepless nights were down to her, but they were no bother. She felt privileged to help the little helpless baby but felt she did not do much. Yet never a day went by to be bored to sit and watch him for hours.Emilie Larter and Adam

Over the next two years, Emily visited Adam as often as she could by working in a teaching job in the UK. But the short visits were not enough and she moved back to Uganda in August 2016 after finding work at an international school. Now Adam, who is two-and-a-half, lives with her full time while she tries to adopt him. Emilie said:  She feels like his mum already. We had such a strong bond every time I was coming out but especially now since he’s been living with me. Emilie has to foster Adam until August before applying to the Ugandan courts to legally be his parent. So needs permission from UK to bring Adam back to Britain as he call her mum. She is hopeful they will live together in UK by the end of the year. Emilie plans to fund adoption until she lost her job in December. So prompted her to set up a Go Fund Me crowdfunding page to pay for the process. Emilie’s parents help to support her living costs as she takes her teaching positions to cover Adam’s fees. AdamEmilie admits becoming a mum at age 25 though not on her agenda, she does not regret the path she has taken. It was not in my plan but the last two-and-a-half years in Uganda and Adam is all she thinks about. So either talking about or thinking about him imagines perhaps may not have kids for another 10 years but does not regret her decision and choice to be the mum to Adam. So will be amazing to bring Adam home as her own finally.” While Emilie received overwhelming support for her decision, some online comments question why she wants to remove Adam from his home country. She is coming back to Uganda for him so wants to continue to do that,” she said. Emilie does her best to keep Adam in touch with the village he comes to see siblings or neighbours. Emilie does her best as his mum though mother’s love is the best most important things. And Adam will never get natural biological love from his mother because unfortunately she sadly passed and he was orphaned. Adam’s story is how God turns what devil means for evil to turn to good blessings. So what is impossible with man is POSSIBLE with LORD God Almighty.  God bless all the kindhearted generous donors in Jesus Name. In a similar true story a little 2year old white who girl chose black doll was asked if she did not want white doll like her. She answered both are doctors and equally beautiful playing with black doll.

BLACK AND WHITE DOLLS

SELF-ACCEPTANCE is influenced by the sublime messages of society children are receiving in the early years. Later as adults in life they bear the consequences of living with others perceived as less than themselves in the communities. A caring attitude towards self-acceptance from a healthy point of view is to detox vitriol hatred seeds sown in early childhood. Educational courses often have biased racist undertones and social networks reinforce hatred of some children in schools. Subtle suggestions becomes inner critic causing grieve by inability to be the perfect child accepted or as adult in society. Pressure to fulfil unrealistic dreams by comparing oneself to another is underlying strategy causing anger and division in society. Propaganda tells the false stories through books and images to influence innocent minds to become racists. So it is important to look at the context in which the person questions self- hatred spewing negative ideas about themselves projecting self- hatred on towards others. People are comparing themselves by the views of people’s lives on social media, TV and in the news. So it becomes easy to convince yourself that everyone is having a better time than you. Recognise you are strong, list what makes you personally happy and have a sense of meaning of life, inner peace for good success, joy and happiness. Believe in God, love Jesus, yourself and family even if not perfect. Do not look up to the external visible surface lifestyle of others but deep within inside yourself to use gifts and talents God gave you. Lots of money spent lavishly and glamorously lasts only a short season before craving a new thrill. Those you admire look cool in your eyes but have no deep God morals.img_20161201_160530

Invite Jesus in your heart to strengthen you to overcome self hatred and racism. Change your mindset, do small things to make you feel good like eating healthy food and sleeping well. Play works with children struggling with confidence and low self-esteem. Self-acceptance is to change misinformation, bias to think well of yourself in line with GOD’S plan for your life. Take responsibility for your wellbeing and eliminate stress.  Some people feel ashamed about who they are due to propaganda targeting them as inferior. Be really honest with yourself to transform and renew your mind. Talk to yourself in the mirror daily and declare I am fearfully and wonderfully made in the Image of God. Accept flaws, use your voice be the best you can be, confident, sure of self-acceptance to overcome any low self-esteem issues. Know what you want from life above all and let peace of mind and inner joy reign in your heart with sound mind of Christ. In reality it is helpful and useful to build up confidence in own head first. To help others see you as reliable, trustworthy, interdependable. Everybody is unique so celebrate yourself and do not look for any affirmation approval before you feel human. Only you can do what you do so be the best you, you can be. Others will respond or react to how best you present yourself and what you spew out of your own mouth. Misery loves company so a pity party attracts the wrong people into your life making things worse. You can overcome by rejecting negative voices unaware was implanted from childhood damaging your life. Life is easy, simple if you know how and believe in God your maker’s opinion about you. Everything will be okay stay strong this is your year. Focus and believe in yourself to love you first and love others as God’s people.

END OF THE CIGARETTE

The cost of a packet of cigarettes in Australia will reach AUD$40 (£24) by 2020

Image copyright Getty Images 

Australia was the first country in the world to introduce mandatory plain packaging for tobacco products and UK will have followed suit by May this year. But will any country copy Australia’s plan to keep increasing taxes until a packet of cigarettes costs AUD$40 (£24)?

It’s not easy being a smoker in Australia.

The smoking bans started inside – in workplaces, bars and restaurants – and moved out. “Smokers would congregate on footpaths and near public transport creating clouds of smoke – what we call ‘smoking hotspots’,” says Mark Driver, Sydney’s Park and Recreation Planner.

“Now, smoking is prohibited within 10m (33ft) of a playground, within 4m (13ft) of the entrance to a public building, at rail platforms, taxi ranks and bus stops.”

Those are the rules in New South Wales, but they are mirrored in many other states. Smoking is banned on many beaches, and most Australian states have now banned cigarettes in jail. All states ban smoking in vehicles if children are present. Fines vary, but in some places you may be fined AUD$2,000 (£1,210) if you smoke in the wrong place. And even if you don’t, you’ll be paying more than that each year by 2020, if you smoke just one AUD$40 pack a week.

No smoking sign, Edinburgh Gardens, North Fitzroy, Melbourne

Image copyrightGetty Images

It’s already five years since Australia became the first place in the world to make plain cigarette packaging compulsory. Tobacco-advertising has long been banned, and now branding has too. The boxes are a drab, dark brown colour (deemed the ugliest in the world by a team of Australian researchers), they carry no logos, and graphic health warnings cover most of the front of the box. You see this gigantic, see-and-never-forget kind of image of throat cancer – a hole in the neck, or what a stroke looks like with a brain sliced open,” Chapman explains. Some smokers say they don’t even look at it, but there has been research which shows that with the people who engage in those avoidance strategies, it’s actually a predictor of them quitting later on.”Cigarettes on a shop shelf in Sydney, New South Wales, May 2016

Image copyright Getty Images 

All this came on top of anti-smoking campaigns that have been driving down smoking rates in Australia since the 1970s. “It’s a toxic, poisonous mix of substances, including ammonia, the bleach in toilet cleaner; acetone, the chemical in nail polish remover; benzene, found in paint stripper; and hydrogen cyanide, used in rat poison,” went one advertisement. “And smoking delivers it straight to your body.” The evidence shows that these hard-hitting, graphic ads that really show the harms of smoking are the most effective says Scott Walsberger, head of tobacco control at Cancer Council NSW. But other campaigns have also tried a gentler approach, emphasising how quickly a smoker’s health starts to improve once he or she has quit.

Australian Quitline smoking advertisement

It was this approach taken by creators of an interactive, behavioural change app called My Quit Buddy, launched in 2012.

Offering tips for giving up with the daily motivational messages, distractions to overcome cravings, and a place to share success stories and celebrate milestones, it has now been downloaded more than 400,000 times in Australia alone.


My Perfect Country

In a world where a lot is going wrong, there is also a lot going right. So, what if you could build a country with policies that actually worked, by homing in on ideas from around the world that have been truly successful?


“It shows people that just by even quitting for five days, you can start to see changes – you’ll have more money in your wallet, your skin becomes clearer,” says Paul Den, one of My Quit Buddy’s creators.

“And the community forum shows people that they’re not alone – people generally trust other people more than they trust the government.”

The cumulative effect of these policies is that smoking rates for adults have almost halved since 1980, says Henrietta Moore, of the Institute for Global Prosperity at University College, London, and are now at about 13%, compared to a global average of about 20%. There has also been a decrease of almost 23% in the rate of hospital admissions caused by smoking. Simone Dennis, an associate professor at Australian National University, says a culture of shame surrounding smoking has begun to emerge, and that itself has become a smoking deterrent. Take, for example, the policy of confining smokers to areas where they will not create a public nuisance. If you think about smoking in public, those tend to be spaces that no-one wants to hang out in anyway,” she says. So smokers feel marginalised because they can’t be citizens in public spaces any more, because they’re restricted to these kind of ‘dirty spaces.'”


Tobacco in Australia

  • The government has committed to reduce the number of adults smoking on a daily basis to 10% by 2018
  • Plain-packaging rules insist that 75% of the front of a cigarette pack is covered by a health warning, and 90% of the back
  • Tobacco taxes rose 25% in 2010, and are now rising 12.5% every year
  • The Tasmanian parliament has discussed a bill that would ban smoking for those born after 2000
  • Australia has not gone as far as Bhutan and Turkmenistan which banned the sale of tobacco products

Read: The battle for control of the cigarette packet


These days, smoking is often taken up by people who are on lowest rungs of the socio-economic ladder, she points out, and adds a burden of shame to people who might already be marginalised.” If it’s the poor who are now the most likely to smoke, it’s hard to see how they will afford the AUD$40 pack of cigarettes.

Credit: Original article title Australia Stubbing Smoking By30 January 201

Header by God’sHotSpot reblogged

Listen to My Perfect Country on the BBC World Service

Join the conversation – find the BBC World Service on Facebook and Twitter.