DOES GOD ANSWER PRAYER?

MY LIFE AFTER UNIVERSITY

Kevin BrochMy life changed after university moving home, losing friends, broke unemployed after university. Kevin Broch left uni. with a short feeling of relief and a sense of achievement, followed by a long feeling of being lost. It’s the end of university and, if luck is on your side, you have had the best three years of your life. The nightlife was amazing; you’ve made lots of new, life-long friends, spending hours in the library on coursework and preparing for exams. Hopefully, this has paid off but what now? This is question many students ask themselves when they graduate but few realise adult life is about to come down on them like a tonne of bricks. When Kevin Broch graduated from Royal Holloway University of London, in 2015, was looking forward to leaving uni and beginning professional life. But, the feeling of hopefulness soon turned to helplessness.

‘Heartbroken’

Now a successful music producer, Kevin says teachers prepared him for leaving college and entering university – but when university comes to an end “no-one tells you what is next now it’s down to you. “I had short feeling of relief and a sense of achievement followed by long feeling of being lost,” he says. Many students say the final year of university tends to be the most stressful and that they can’t wait to hand in dissertations and be done with it.

Claire GambleClaire Gamble found it really hard to meet people or settle into new life after university

But leaving can feel like an anticlimax, and that unique feeling of excitement, stimulation and freedom that university provided can be hard to replace. Claire Gamble, 33, says: “I felt heartbroken moving out of my house on last day of university I couldn’t stop crying.” After four great years of living independently and making solid friends while studying at University of Sheffield didn’t know what was happening next. Claire is not alone. Loneliness seems to be common feature of graduation blues. Kayleigh Rattle, 31, graduated from Warwick University in 2008, says: “Never forgets indescribable loneliness felt leaving university. “And, actually, I try not to think about the experience too much today because it still triggers a wistfulness so palpable for a time that’s now passed, and happened a decade ago.”

New identity

Many students aren’t ready to say their goodbye to close companions when they all go home. University prepares young people for transition from adolescence into adulthood but not the realities of working life? Graduate employment rate stands at 82% according to the Office of National Statistics in 2017, so it takes time to secure a fulltime job. So after three years of relative freedom, hordes of students will probably find themselves packing their bags and trundling back home to their parents’ house. Kayleigh says: “I really struggled with that – having a curfew again, not being able to sleep in the same bedroom as my boyfriend, and, I felt, being treated like a child again.”

Kayleigh RattleKayleigh Rattle describes university as combination of indispensable relationships and learning

This feeling of stepping backwards can be an extra incentive to find a “proper job”. Carolyn Mumby, counsellor coach with British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, says: “The return home can feel like trying to squash yourself back into the shape of your previous self. “It can be challenging to maintain your autonomy. “You may be challenging autonomy of your parents and carers who have adjusted to life without you living at home. There is a renegotiation of roles and relationships. Sophie Phillipson, 27, felt “ovewhelmed” and “nervous” at the prospect of facing adult life. She went on to found the website HelloGrads, which offers skills to help ease the transition from education to working life. She says: “You come out with a good degree and then reality hits. And it’s quite difficult because you think you’re going to get a good job, if you don’t, you can become overwhelmed.” Emily Williams, 24, and a Sheffield Hallam graduate, took a job that was really disappointing. She says she used to walk to work every day and think: “How can I get slightly injured, not enough to be seriously hurt or die, but just enough so I don’t have to go to work?” She suggests people take time to find out what they want to do. “There is absolutely no shame in going back home and getting a job at your local supermarket whilst you figure out what your passions are,” she says. “Don’t feel like you should already know what you want to do.”

Julie and Sophie PhillipsonSophie Phillipson, and her mother, Julie, set up website HelloGrads to help other young people transition from university into adult working life

Sophie says: “There’s a lot more to consider than you first think – and nobody tells you. “Money is constantly on your mind and there is a huge pressure to succeed from your parents, even though they have the best intentions.”

‘Blagging it’

Student fees tripled in 2012 and Sophie believes this has a part to play in the pressure students place on themselves to succeed and make their degree “worth it.” Social media doesn’t help. “No-one posts the countless rejections they faced to get to their position,” Sophie says. But it isn’t all doom and gloom. Graduates are still likely to be employed than people with fewer qualifications. Claire says that although leaving university was tough, 12 years on she is settled, has a family of her own and a successful business. She believes young people shouldn’t expect working life to be like university. But should “embrace new challenges, because your next adventures are just beginning.” Emily seconds this and says: “No-one has a clue what they’re doing. People in their 30s tell me they don’t feel like proper adults yet. “Everyone is going with the flow and blagging it as they go.”

 

AMAZING MIRACLE RESCUE

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Thank God Almighty for this amazing miracle rescue of the coach and Wild Boar team boys trapped in the cave in Thailand has made headlines all over the world. This miracle surpassed any past cave rescue missions so involved numerous international cave diving experts. Thanks to excellent teamwork, all managed to overcome overwhelming challenges to rescue team successfully. It is beyond any other previous daring rescues without precedence yet worked together to rescue the team and experts who risked their lives to save them. The poignant issue that stood out for me is a miracle of ability to communicate with  the two British cave divers who helped to rescue the team. How on earth would they understand each other without the only English speaker among. It would probably have caused further delays or complicated matters. In counselling the concept of entering cave means getting into the most painful areas of life one does not want address. The mountain in this case described as sleeping woman so symbolically her womb was entered. The flood birth water had to be drained so human life is born. Like a birthpang labour pain is unpredictable and time-consuming the process was daunting but by the Grace of God team delivered safely to the Glory of God. unnamed (1)The 12 boys were all rescued and taken to hospital to be checked with the coach and later released press conference. On 23 June, 12 boys and their football coach walked into cave after football practice in northern Thailand. The boys, who are part of the Moo Pa – Wild Boars  football team became trapped when heavy rains flooded the Tham Luang cave to cut off their escape route. All 12 boys and their coach have been freed from the cave. A few details about the group have been released. Here is what we know about the boys and their coach:Chanin VibulrungruangChanin Vibulrungruang (Nickname: Titan), 11 is the youngest in the team, who played as a forward. Titan started playing football at seven before joining his school’s sports club. He was later invited to join Wild Boars football club.Panumas SangdeePanumas Sangdee (Nickname: Mig), 13. According to Nopparat Kantawong, the head coach of the football team, Mig is bigger than other kids his age, but he is agile. He is a defender for Wild Boars.Duganpet PromtepDuganpet Promtep (Nickname: Dom), 13 is a striker, and captain of the Wild Boars, Dom has reportedly been scouted by many professional clubs in Thailand. He is said to be motivator and respected by team for his football skills. Players on field need captain like him because sometimes a coach can’t get in to solve their problems,” Nopparat told the BBC.

Adul Sam-onAdul Sam-on, 14 born in Myanmar’s self-governing Wa State and left his family behind to get a better education in Thailand, according to reports. The left defender speaks Thai, Burmese, Chinese and English, and was the only one able to communicate with the British divers when the group was first discovered. While trapped in the cave, the boys and their relatives exchanged letters, carried by the rescue divers. Adul told his parents he missed them and not to worry. “Mum and Dad want to see your face,” his parents wrote. “Mum and Dad pray for you and your friends, so we can see each other soon.”  Adul is also a talented volleyball player – and part of a local team that came second in all of northern Thailand two years in a row, local teacher Bunjob Chai-arm told BBC. Adul said he learnt as a Christian in Church. So an amazing miracle the team gets on well together despite being from different faiths. This mutual respect is a great advantage and so its good to learn basic English.  Somepong JaiwongSomepong Jaiwong (Nickname: Pong), 13 is a cheerful boy who likes football, and all sports. He dreams of becoming a footballer for the Thai national team,” his teacher Manutsanun Kuntun told AFP. The left winger wrote to parents from inside the cave, saying: “I love Dad and Mum. Don’t worry about me, I’m safe.” His parents replied: “Take good care of yourself and be strong said Dad and Mum and all are waiting for you.”Mongkol BooneiamMongkol Booneiam (Nickname: Mark), 12. Mark has been described by his teacher as a “very respectful” boy. He cheerful, energetic, very friendly, and likes football and volleyball, Bunjob Chai-arm told the BBC. Mark and his mother had moved to Thailand from Myanmar. He plays in same volleyball team as Adul. His father Thinnakorn Boonpiem told AFP that his son is a “good boy” who loves to study – almost as much as football.Nattawut TakamrongNattawut Takamrong (Nickname: Tern), 14. In a letter to his parents, Tern told them not to worry about him. The defender wrote he missed his parents and grandparents, but “Tern can take care of myself. “Dad and mum are not angry at you and do not blame you,” his parents replied, adding that they were waiting for him “in front of the cave.”Peerapat SompiangjaiPeerapat Sompiangjai (Nickname: Night), 17. Night plays as right winger on the team. He went missing on his birthday and his parents say they are still waiting to hold his party. According to reports, the boys went into the cave to celebrate Night’s birthday. They were said to have brought treats and snacks along with them. The supplies probably helped sustain group in the many days spent trapped inside the cave. Sittthisak Sawanrak, who goes to the same cycling club as Night, describes him as “a great lad who just loves to cycle and play football.“He’s a quiet boy – doesn’t talk much, but a very good, polite boy,” he told the BBC. In a letter to his parents from the cave, Night wrote: “Night loves everyone” and drew several hearts.Ekarat WongsukchanEkarat Wongsukchan (Nickname: Bew), 14. Bew is the goalkeeper of the team. In a letter to his mother, Bew promised to help her sell things at her shop once he was rescued.Prajak SuthamPrajak Sutham (Nickname: Note), 15. Note is described by family friends as a “smart, quiet guy who loves sport and supports Chiang Rai United.” Family friend Ponrawee Tachavandee told the BBC he was “shocked” when he learned Note was trapped. “I didn’t expect he would go inside cave.” Rinlinee Sombat, who works in the same garage as Note’s father, describes him as a kind boy who takes care of his two-year-old sister, and enjoys playing with her young son. He is a smart kid, when you teach him how to fix something in garage learns how to do it after just one go,” she told the BBC.Pipat PhoPipat Pho (Nickname: Nick), 15 in his letter, Nick told his parents he wants to go for Mookatha, or Thai barbeque, when he comes out of the cave. “Nick loves Mum, Dad and siblings,” he wrote, alongside a drawing of a heart.Pornchai KamluangPornchai Kamluang (Nickname: Tee), 16. Tee is a defender for the Wild Boars. “Don’t worry, I’m very happy”, said Tee in a letter to his parents.The mood was tense as people waited for news of high-risk operation. The Assistant coach Ekapol Chantawong (Nickname: Ake), 25. Ake reportedly born in Myanmar and lost his parents at a young age. Before becoming a football coach, spent several years as a Buddhist monk, and learnt to conserve energy by restricting movements and meditating. According to local news reports, taught these techniques to the boys in the cave. In his letter, Ake apologised to parents for taking boys into cave network, but many replied to say they did not blame him. “I promise I will take care of the kids as best as I can,” Ake wrote.The found Thai cave boys July 2018The group of boys and their coach were found after nine days. Some media reports suggest that when the group was found Ake was the weakest, having refused to eat any of the food they had brought with them, giving it instead to the boys. His note aincluded a message to his aunt and grandmother, informing them that he was “fine.” Do not worry too much about me. Take good care of your health,” he wrote, adding: “Please prepare vegetable juice and pork rind for me to eat when I get out. Thanks.”A composite image showing the rescued football teamThank God meant finally, they had been found. Two British Mr Volanthen and Richard Stanton were in the cave after being called in by Thai authorities with another British caving expert Robert Harper. The trio arrived in Thailand 3 days after football team went missing. More than 1,000 people were involved in operation from all over the world.Richard William Stanton Robert Charles Harper and John Volanthen(From Left to right) Richard Stanton, Robert Harper and John Volanthen. The British Cave Rescue Council (BCRC) – the body for voluntary underground rescue in British Isles in contact with British divers since the return. Bill Whitehouse, council’s vice chairman, said the men described dive as “gnarly” in an email, meaning there were complications and problems.  It was 11 hour round trip, involving a 1.5km passage, flooded open he told BBC’s Breakfast.Cross section of cave showing various hazardsOn hearing the boys were found, Mr Whitehouse said: “It was really quite a moment, I can tell you.” However, he said that “moment of euphoria” for the divers and the boys would have been followed by: “Now what?”Bill Whitehouse of British Cave Rescue Council was in touch with the divers. Around 4,000 volunteers worked to clean up the area around cave which was battered by relays of rescuers, volunteers and news crews.

What we know about trio

Mr Volanthen and Mr Stanton are part of the South and Mid Wales Cave Rescue Team. John and Rick involved in a good number of rescues over the years, and they’ve got lot of personal expertise to take to Thailand,” the team’s chairman, Gary Mitchell, saidIn France in 2010 the pair were part of a team attempting to rescue a trapped diverMr Stanton, a retired firefighter from Coventry, was also involved in the rescue of six British cavers in Mexico in 2004.Richard StantonRichard Stanton was made an MBE in recognition of his cave diving rescue services. During that rescue Mr Stanton was able to persuade one of the group – who was terrified of water – to make a 180-metre dive out of the cave, the West Midlands Fire Service said. In a 2007 interview, he said he became interested in diving after watching a programme called “Underground Eiger” as a child. He joined caving and diving clubs at university. Speaking to the BBC in 2004 he described difficulties of navigating caves: “When people land on the moon they had a map, they knew where they were going but in cave if you’re beyond known limit of the cave, nobody knows where it goes, you don’t know what will happen round the corner.” Mr Stanton was made an MBE in the New Year’s Honours List at the end of 2012 for his cave diving rescue services.John Volanthen at rescueJohn Volanthen is a member of South and Mid Wales Cave Rescue Team. Mr Volanthen is an IT consultant based in Bristol but who grew up in Brighton. He started caving as a scout. Spoke to the Sunday Times in 2013, said cave rescue required calm heads.“Panic adrenalines are great in certain situations but not in cave-diving,” he said. “The last thing you want is an adrenaline whatsoever.” He added: “cave diving is like a puzzle with fox, chicken and grain, not dangerous if you do it right.” According to an online profile, Mr Volanthen runs marathons and ultra-marathons. He joked “he runs to eat more biscuits.” His mother Jill said she felt ‘absolute pride’ over son’s role in rescue effort in Thailand.img_20180809_162823.jpg

Artists rallied together to create mural to commemorate event by various team members showing cave rescuers and the supporting teams that helped to achieve this miracle. The rescue teams included local divers and a cave doctor from Australia and soldiers volunteers, whole Thailand nation plus all nations helped in the search and rescue of 12 teenage boys and football coach who disappeared into a cave network in Thailand. Professional divers helped to find the group but high water and the mud in narrow passages drove them back when Jonathan Head was with search teams. Eventually the Wild Boar team was safely rescued after 17 days in the cave and now back home, thanks and Glory to God. In life people descend into emotional trauma caves sometimes requiring whole lot of global specialists to understand daring missions to help overcome. Counselling demands people be willing to let in others to dig deeper to deal with the hidden cave issues affecting your life. Despite opening up and feeling vulnerable it is worthwhile getting help. Everyone in life most of the time needs somebody so all others are in it together whether inside or on the outside cave it takes mutual support to survive daily challenges in life.

 

More on this story

  • Thai boys and parents send letters of love & reassurance 7 July 2018
  • Video Thai cave: Wife and father mourn ‘hero’ diver on 9 July 2018
  • Thailand cave rescue: Community united in hope 6 July 2018
  • Brits helped find boys 3 July 2018
  • Thai cave rescue: psychological effects 8 July 2018
Reblogged

GOD’S LOVELIFE UNIVERSITY

f9d9975e6ceddf223b967732e0cba030.jpgGOD’S LOVELIFE University is our most PRICELESS ASSET AS THE GREATEST PRICE GOD ETERNAL Treasure of souls possess in Christ. Father Almighty God is the Chancellor of True Real Love and Jesus Christ is Love Pro Vice Chancellor and Holy Spirit our Professor Emeritus Who teaches and Brings Remembrance in all things. We know the Bible says it is better to GAIN YOUR SOUL and lose the whole world because we are in the world but not of the world. GREATEST ASSET TREASURE gained is life in Jesus Christ Who intercedes and Prays for all God’s Children who love to listen, obey turn around to follow GOD’S KINGDOM. The most important lesson in University of life is ALL THINGS WORK TOGETHER FOR GOOD for all those who LOVE GOD and are CALLED ACCORDING TO GOD’S PLANS AND PURPOSES. So Tuning in to GOD’S WILL for mankind refines and retunes our lives to be in Tune with GOD. The WORDS of WISDOM from God Opens eyes of our understanding to know better to make wiser choices in line with GOD’S design for our lives through Christ. The times we live in show MORE than ever before mankind desperately needs God. Most man-made ideas and plans have not lived up to to GOD’S STANDARD. So some are still searching through vanity for fulfilment that comes only from God.7e1f5d2cb2d3c40a2c8e835a229ff088.jpgBy appreciating God and living by HIS WAY every experience we go through in life becomes of GREAT Value to God and a BLESSING Spiritually discerned to help ENCOURAGE and give HOPE to others by our shared experiences. All experiences including miracles God makes from our mistakes help to learn that God makes a PLAN by recalculating the road like Sat Nav in a car. So in life if one really never experiences anything how can you be able to UNDERSTAND HOW IT FEELS LIKE TO EMPATHISE with any person going through such experience. Once you live through these experiences you GAIN Spirit of Excellence and Distinction as Overcomer to minister and support all others better. Give GOD THANKS in all circumstances and give HIM GLORY in Jesus Name. These experiences are NOT caused by God but often used by God through us to testify as it becomes our gifts and calling to help others. Thank God and share your heart in-depth with others. Continue to claim all BLESSINGS and healing promises of God in life in Jesus Name as GOD CONTINUES daily to BLESS and sustain life by HIS SPIRIT. Life is a GIFT to use for His GLORY and TESTIMONY because we defeat the devil by our testimony and by the Blood of the Lamb Jesus Christ.