FASTFASHION HARMS EARTH

ClothesFast fashion is harming the planet, MPs say environmental impact of disposable clothing in perfect condition needs to be tackled urgently.  Young people’s love of fast fashion is coming under scrutiny of Britain’s law-makers. MPs say fashion industry is major source of greenhouse gases overheating the planet. Discarded clothes are piling up in landfill sites and fibre fragments are flowing into the sea when clothes are washed. The retailers admit more needs to be done, but say they are already working to reduce the impact of their products.Graphic: Numbers on our consumption of fashion

What do MPs say?

The House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee says there is a basic problem with an industry that relies on persuading people to throw away good clothes because they are “last year’s colour.” Psychilogical manipulation of a person feeling left out if not wearing the latest clothing means some even wear an item only once. So do not want to be seen photgraphed or attending function in same clothes. Those who do are even mocked and laughed at by their peers. It has serious consequences because it is affecting the environment. It quotes evidence that:

  • British shoppers buy far more new clothes than any nation in Europe
  • People buy twice as many items of clothing as they did a decade ago
  • Fish in the seas eat synthetic fibres dislodged from the washing

The MPs have written to the UK’s top fashion bosses asking how they can maintain the £28bn benefit their industry brings to the UK economy, while reducing the environmental harm. They believe swift action is essential, because if current clothes consumption continues “…they will account for more than a quarter of our total impact on climate change by 2050”, chairwoman Mary Creagh told BBC News. “Three in five garments end in landfill or incinerators within a year that’s expensive fuel! Half a million tonnes of microfibres a year enter the ocean. Doing nothing is not an option.”Second-handMore clothing must be re-used or gifted

What are the solutions?

The committee’s report to government could include a call for the fashion industry to create less pollution, a demand for longer life for garments and a ban on dumping clothes in landfill. The MPs also have concerns about social impacts. They believe fast fashion is fuelling quick turnarounds among suppliers, which may lead to poor working conditions. Among their questions to retailers are:

  • Do you pay the living wage and how do you ensure child labour is not used in factories?
  • Do you use recycled materials?
  • How long do you keep clothes, and how do you encourage recycling?
  • Do you incinerate unsold or returned stock?
  • How are you reducing the flow of microfibres into the sea?Presentational grey line

The Retailers Response?

Peter Andrews, head of sustainability at the British Retail Consortium, told BBC News population growth and increased demand have led to an increase in the overall volume and environmental impact of clothing. But said members are now designing products that are made to last, and they are encouraging customers to return unwanted clothes for reuse. “We know more needs to be done, but the best answers will be achieved with collaborative global actions.” The companies approached by MPs are: M&S, Primark, Next, Arcadia, Asda, TK Maxx and HomeSense, Tesco, JD Sports Fashion, Debenhams, Sports Direct International.

Science & Environment

WE LOVE OUR BIG BODIES

We love our big bodies people call fat and able to do as much as we can by our talents and abilities. We work so hard to accomplish excellence in our fields of expertise yet our size seems to matter to some people more than getting to know us. We are ordinary people doing extraordinary things so enjoy life as much as possible. We decided to speak out on behalf of the people fatshamed to be miserable or to spend their whole life trying to be someone they are not. Some develop anorexia and bulimia by trying to be slim and control their weight. In the extreme cases lost their lives due to pressure to be stereotypical average size whatever that means. Magazine, TV, media, entertainment industry portray an unrealistic image of the majority of women. Young people look up to such images so refuse to eat properly. Photographer Alice Zoo speaks to six women on body positivity and fat activism to support people who face abuse daily go educate the public.

COURTNEY, 24, GRIMSBY

@bodypositivebelle

“I’ve been big from a young age. I was 10, I was diagnosed with underactive thyroid, so each year I’ve put on more weight. I was always really active, so it was strange. New lumps and bumps formed that I didn’t know what to do with. I was bullied a lot throughout my school years I hated my body absolutely hated it. It really affected my mental health. When I was in college, I went on a big, long-term diet and lost five stone. I was a lot slimmer though I was big but I realised I wasn’t a better person, I wasn’t beautiful, I wasn’t amazing. I was still same person, but a lot less happy. Then I discovered Instagram. I remember seeing the first girl that used a body positive hashtag and I thought she looked amazing. I remember seeing the first girl’s body positive hashtag so I thought she looks amazing. But one night someone commented on all of my pictures saying I was fat and looked like someone from Star Wars. I messaged her and asked her why she was doing it. Why she found it fun to hurt someone like that. She replied, and later admitted that she had hang-ups about her own body. She said she felt fat. It made me think that often people are just pushing their own insecurities out. Someone will look at me and think: ‘I don’t want to be that size, I wouldn’t be happy that size, so why should you be happy when you’re fat?’ It makes me sad to think about people struggling so much they think the only way to make themselves feel better is to put someone down. That’s not the way. You can’t be comparing yourself to other people. I know it’s not easy, but the sooner you start to see yourself, how great you are, the better. You won’t need to judge someone by their looks.

ENAM, 23, BIRMINGHAM

@enamasiama

“I love the way I look and feel, because I’m comfortable, don’t feel any different from anyone else. I wake up and see myself as this normal person. I always tell people that I love my belly, I love my boobs. These squidgy parts might be seen as fat to someone else, but to me it’s just comfortable. There’s no-one out there who’s going to tell you that you’re not beautiful when you’re fat, simple as.

Find those who treasure and appreciate you and tell others how good they make you feel. Don’t be a person who always demoralises someone, or always being judgmental, because you have flaws. All have things they need to work on body.

“I have been waiting to be thin most of my life – to lose weight. I’ve put a lot of things on hold. When a kid growing up in Poland, I was quite sickly with upper throat infections and had to go to places we called sanatoriums to get better. Every time I went to one, they would put me on a low-calorie diet. They were always saying that I had to lose weight. Nowadays, when I look at photos from childhood, I don’t see anything wrong. I wasn’t skinny, but I wasn’t fat. But I was made to feel that there was something wrong. A few years ago, I started feeling a growing sense of anger so consuming a lot of feminist blogs and podcasts, and they talked about body positivity and self-love. I got to point where I thought, ‘There’s nothing wrong with the way I look, there’s nothing wrong with the way anyone looks. I’m just going to live my life.’ I stopped waiting to buy nice clothes, I just bought the clothes that fitted me. I started going on holiday. I started wearing a swimsuit and going swimming, which I always used to love when I was a kid. Now my attitude is:
‘Don’t like what you see look elsewhere else!’ N
o longer trying to change myself to fit society so trying to change society so it can fit me. Body positivity is not for fat people or skinny people it’s for everyone. Body positivity is the freedom that comes with being able to be happy with yourself. It gives you so much time to do other things, to travel, to think, to write, to make friends without having to worry about how you look all the time. Everyone could use a bit of body positivity in their life.”

MERCEDEZ, 28, LONDON / CHICAGO @missmermaidezpublic

“I was on a flight recently and I asked for a seat belt extender, I’m totally comfortable asking for – it doesn’t bother me. I was told I would have to pay for it. I said, ‘No thanks’, and they just ignored it, so I went without a seat belt from London to Morocco and back again. People think being fat is our fault. I struggled with not feeling desirable as a teenager. I thought I would never find a partner, that nobody would love me in the body I had. I look back at the time where I hated myself the most and I’m like – I was so cute. Why would anyone think these things? I do feel sensitive about desirability, through relationships and especially the way men have treated me as disposable. But I know that I’m hot. I know that I’m a worthy human being so it has nothing to do with my size. I know my body is some people’s greatest fear, to confront that is uncomfortable. To confront me being happy and living life and feeling healthy whatever that means threatens people’s desires to fit into beauty norm. I think it scares people you exist in the way you haven’t been told you can.”

TARA, 30, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE

@fatandfab88

“Sometimes being fat is awesome, and sometimes it’s difficult. Spaces aren’t designed for larger bodies. And public transport is a nightmare. You need two seats on an plane. But a big body has just as much right as a smaller body.I think as I’ve got older, I just care less. Or I care more about myself and less about what’s expected of me. Being fat feels rebellious. Being fat and loving yourself is something completely different. I used to hate it. I wouldn’t eat. I wanted my skin to be lighter, so when I was in primary school, cover myself in talcum powder. Now, of course, I realise there’s nothing wrong with me. It would help if there were fat dolls out there for kids. Dolls like Barbie, have an unattainable shape. For everyone – of any size, race, whatever it’s not manageable. As I’ve got older, I’ve grown into my body. That’s the best way to say it. It kind of grew on me. When I finally became happy with where I was, when I stopped always trying to improve, that made a big difference. My partner helped loads as well. People think that if you’re fat then you can’t be healthy. You can be really big, and not as healthy as you should be. But then you’re happy, so it’s about weighing up what’s more important. When I’m smaller, I’m a state. I’m a happy size, and a healthy size, for all of me. For my mental health and my physical health, which are almost the same thing.”

SHARON, 30, LONDON

“When I was a kid, I didn’t feel happy in myself. I felt that I was ugly and my self-worth was really low bullied a lot. I developed and came out of myself a bit in my later teens. But it wasn’t until I found out about fat acceptance and fat positivity that I really came into my own. I was able to start looking at my self-worth as being more than whether or not I’m aesthetically pleasing to wider society. Now, some days I think I’m beautiful, other days I don’t. I have the knowledge that when things aren’t great, I can actually break it down and think OK Sharon, it’s not because you’re fat, it’s not because of you, it’s because of society’s impression of you.’ Because you’ve absorbed so many images from the media. There’s nothing wrong with you, it’s just the way that you’ve been made to feel. I’m a lot more in control of how I feel about myself. Fat activism is liberating fat people from social norms, and the discrimination and negativity that comes alongside that. We want society to accept us as human beings whose worth is not defined by weight, appearance or health. The biggest thing is to not make assumptions about why fat people are fat, or that they’re unhealthy. Just ask us. Ask us how we feel about our bodies. Be open-minded.”