DEFIBRILLATOR SAVES LIFE

article-1329133-0BFE2B7F000005DC-908_468x322Using defibrillator recently installed at a boy’s school highlights urgent training for public to use them. A 15-year-old’s life is saved by father after Ethan Askew started to feel ill in sports class and told his teacher before he stopped breathing and collapsed in his arms. Stuart Askew works as premises manager at Steiner Academy school at Much Dewchurch in Herefordshire, which his son attends, and ran to deliver emergency aid. He said afterwards: It was very scary, but I remembered we had a defibrillator so didn’t doubt it will be OK ending. NHS England and NHS Scotland are joining British Heart Foundation and Microsoft over next 12 months to create database of defibrillators across UK. The move is in response to figures of public-access to defibrillators used is less than 3% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests British Heart Foundation says it “significantly reduces the survival chances of tens of thousands of people each year.” Stuart says the device was “very easy” to use, acknowledges considering the stressful circumstances. “Thank God this terrible and frightening experience turned into life saving of son. Ambulance arrived in five minutes and Ethan was taken to the hospital and put in induced coma. Tests revealed one of his coronary arteries is too narrow as random genetic condition and because he exercised so much, not enough oxygen was getting to his heart.Ethan Askew went back to school to see his friends three days after his double coronary bypassThree days after his operation Ethan surprised his friends at school and was filled in on what went on at school the day he collapsed. Ethan had surgery to replace his artery. Now 16, he says he’s fully recovered and “even better than before.” He says it feels like a bizarre dream. “I still can’t believe it happened. Honestly I can’t remember anything from that day. I can remember the day before and I can’t remember anything in past until I woke up from my induced coma and then after that it was a bit hazy.” And he was not fully aware it was his Dad that saved him. “Everything was so overwhelming, I didn’t really acknowledge it that much. I kind of just accepted everything that happened from then on. “They only told me they put it in two days before after I came out of hospital, so was quite a surprise.”IMG_20180810_075002Ethan AskewEthan was hiking in the Brecon Beacons six months after his collapse. But Stuart says things could be very different. “He was due to go on his Duke of Edinburgh silver expedition the week after, which means he’d have been in the middle of the Brecon Beacons. We’re so fortunate that it happened within sight almost of a community defibrillator.” The first thing Stuart did when he went back to work was to register the defibrillator with the West Midlands Ambulance service. He says people shouldn’t be scared to use them in an emergency, even if they haven’t had any first aid training. “Have the confidence that the device is there to help. As soon as you unzip pack only one or two buttons to press and the device tells you what to do. “Don’t be afraid and just know that you’re doing some good – you have the potential to save someone’s life having the guts to go get this device is really is having confidence to grab it to help save somebody’s life. Airports, village halls, railway stations and nationwide is now available so look out for them. You can help save 30,000 people who suffer cardiac arrest away from hospital each year.  Chances of survival are as high as 75 per cent if defibrillation is delivered rapidly. British Heart Foundation said at least 230 lives are saved already. A heart attack is the main cause of cardiac arrest, when the heart stops effectively pumping blood around body and goes into ventricular fibrillation, meaning the muscles are contracting randomly rather than regularly so heart stops. A defibrillator uses electricity to shock the heart out of this lethal rhythm and back to normal. From the moment one stops breathing, it takes four minutes before brain starts to die. Applying a controlled shock within five minutes of collapse provides best chance of survival. For every minute heart stopped, chances of staying alive reduced by 14 per cent. It is important to remember you can be someone to use defibrillator,’ says Clive James, St John Ambulance trainer. The AED automatically carries out many of the key stages of resuscitation, such as recognising electrocardiogram rhythm (ECG). ‘This assesses whether the heart is shockable,’ says James. ‘In 80 per cent of cases it will be.’ Shoppers at London's Westfield practice using a defibrillatorShoppers at Westfield practice using a defibrillator, 10,000 AEDs placed in shopping centres, airports, village halls and railway stations. If cardiac arrest has not occurred, rhythm incompatible, a shock not administered. So sensitive are machines they assess how strong the shock needs to be so most city’s Tube and train stations, international airports, churches, schools or in the markets to provide AEDs on sites placed in small white boxes on walls around these places to notice in advance in case you need to help someone. Open the box and lift out the AED to find a small package containing two sticky pads you plug into the main AED box similar to a child’s lunchbox. Its latest technology of adhesive pads for better contact with skin than traditional paddles. The gyms need AED trained volunteers to help the fitness instructors during emergency. A defibrillator pack has turn on machine instruction’s so voice says put pads on a patient’s chest and press buttons.Alice Smellie with a defibrillator pack

Carefully lay the two large, white sticky pads on bare chest, one up near right shoulder and the other down by the left ribs. The normal-electro impulse starts in the top right-hand side of the heart and passes to the bottom left-hand side. The machine’s electricity pass through heart’s normal route. The AED tells you it checks heart rhythm. ‘Clear!’ Means press the orange shock button if heart in arrest, the shock brings back rhythm but for training pads no current runs through. It is crucial to remember the medic and onlookers take care not to touch patient. ‘There are no recorded cases of injury, but it’s not worth risking an electric shock. Importance of AEDs is remember to locate and use them and be sure to supply at least three in small premises and 20 in large complexes of playing sports centres. Clinically dead for minutes saved by the defibrillator available and someone prepared to use it. Defibrillators need onsite training for volunteers to test out AED on dummy. Shoppers be aware where its available, as public allowed its use in emergency. Ideally people should be trained, but lack of training shouldn’t stop use,’ says Dr Jasmeet Soar, of the Resuscitation Council, body behind recent change in regulation. Studies show schoolchildren are able to turn them on and follow the instructions. Trained first-aider may not be at the sight of collapsed patient so people can help save lives. Generis, 37, saved two lives using defibrillator said  help save someone. He felt buzz as the paramedics arrived and they told him he brought patients back.’ If one suffers cardiac arrest there’s a good chance of survival thanks to AED in sports and social clubs. AEDs are everywhere. And that’s very reassuring. Above all take care of personal health, eat, rest, sleep, and drink plenty of water. Remember God is life Giver so honour and preserve life. It is good to press the chest to kick start or give the kiss of life. Learn more about reviving people using massage in places where there is no defibrillator. People use massage and rely totally on prayer in the Mighty Name of Jesus of Nazareth to raise the dead. GLORY be to God.

http://www.sja.org.uk, bhf.org.u

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STOP BLOOD CLOTS IN BODY

Venous thromboembolism(VTE) blood clots diagnosis is a serious preventable medical condition. So its important to know VTE or deep vein thrombosis (DVT) happens to anybody at any age and causes serious illness, disability and in some cases, death. VTE is prevented and treated if discovered early. PE in SCD patients is etiologic factor in patients who develop respiratory symptoms. Xray imaging procedure scans chest for blood clots treated with full-dose anticoagulation. Diagnosis of venous thromboembolism by positive Duplex ultrasound, ventilation-perfusion scan, or computed tomography angiography in most cases. Radiology reports for patients with documented history of anticoagulation treatment venous thromboembolism cases. This criterion verifies the high specificity history venous thromboembolism. So thromboembolism data collected on date of diagnosis, recurrence, site of thrombosis, central venous catheter-related status. Additional triggering factors includes oral contraceptives, pregnancy, cancer, hospitalization, surgery recorded. Hospitalization associated clots defined by venous thromboembolism occurring 24 hours after admission or within 90-days after discharge. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a condition in which blood clot forms thrómbōsis  clotting inside the blood vessels obstructing flow of blood through the circulatory system. If a blood vessel vein or artery is injured, the body uses platelets thrombocytes and fibrin to form blood clot to prevent blood loss. Even when blood vessel is not injured, blood clots form in body under certain conditions. The blood clot or piece of clot breaks free, travels around body as embolus in body blocking small blood vessels. Symptoms are chest pain shortness of breath, leg pain, problems speaking, or moving parts of body. As clotting factors and platelets used up bleeding occurs with blood in urine, blood in stool, bleeding in skin. Complication include organ failure. Red blood cells are principal means delivering oxygen (O2) to body tissues via blood flow circulatory system. RBCs take up oxygen in lung released into tissues squeezing through body’s capillaries. Blood clot blocks circulation causing severe pain or bruising mark on leg.  Treatment for a pulmonaryembolism is at the hospital to treat underlying causes of deep vein thrombosis. This starts with anticoagulant medications asheparin and warfarin to stop blood clots from returning. Pulmonary embolism occurs as clump of blood clot gets wedged into artery in lungs. Blood clots from leg condition deep vein thrombosis (DVT). A catheter is inserted into vein in the groin upper thigh or arm and threaded to clots in the lung. The doctor may use catheter to remove clot or deliver medicine to dissolve it. Rarely, surgery is needed to remove the blood clotClots block oxygen flow 2.4 million erythrocytes produced per second in human adults affected. Blocks red cells developing in bone marrow circulating 100–120 days in the body before component recycled by macrophages. Circulation takes 60 seconds or one minute and a quarter of the cells in human body are red blood cells. And the blood volume is 40% to 45% is red blood cells. Blood related conditions are critical life situations so must be taken urgently, extremely seriously. Every second counts and they must have continous oxygen supply during crises. The blood clots can appear incredibly quickly, due to a number of factors like change in temperature. It causes a number of problems in the body and causes issues heart attacks. If found during routine check ups clot dealt with before obstructing oxygen in red blood portal veins or arteries.S_0917_deep-vein-thrombosis_M17501.2e16d0ba.fill-767x511

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs if a blood clot (thrombus) forms in one or more of the deep veins in body, usually in legs. Deep vein thrombosis causes leg pain or swelling occur with cramps or no symptoms. Deep vein thrombosis develops if certain medical conditions affect blood clots. It happens if not mobile for long time after surgery confined to bed. Deep vein thrombosis is serious because blood clots in veins break loose, travel through bloodstream and lodge in the lungs blocking blood flow oxygen by pulmonary embolism. A lack of fresh oxygen from lungs causes breathing difficulties and shortage of breath so life threatening. Treatment is for 5-7 days or typically for 3-6 months, though blood thinners are continued for life if clotting disorder increases risk of another clot. After seven days, the clot is unlikely to be completely resolved so total time taken depends on the size of the clot. Most blood clots occur in lower legs and form when an individual is inactive for a lengthy period of time. A blood clot may develop in a patient’s leg after spending hours sitting or cramped on a plane. The symptoms experienced vary based on a size of clot, bigger clots are more painful than a smaller-sized ones. Those who have a blood clot in an arm or leg can experience swelling and tenderness. If the clot is small, minor calf swelling can occur but bigger blood clots cause whole leg or arm to swell. Those who have a clot notice a warm sensation or the affected area may turn bluish in color. The symptoms of a deep vein thrombosis signs and symptoms can include: Swelling in the affected leg. Rarely, there’s swelling in both legs.

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  • Pain in leg often starts in calf and feels like cramping soreness.
  • Red or discolored skin on the leg.
  • A feeling of warmth in affected leg.

Deep vein thrombosis occurs without noticeable symptoms sometimes. See a doctor if developed signs or symptoms of deep vein thrombosis, contact doctor. If developed the signs or symptoms of a pulmonary embolism a life-threatening complication of deep vein thrombosis seek immediate medical attention.

Pneumonia is also an inflammatory condition of lung affecting primarily the small air sacs called alveoli. At the end of the breathing tube of lungs, clusters of tiny air sacs become inflamed and fill up with fluid. Symptoms include some combination of dry cough, chest pain, fever, and trouble breathing. This can be triggered by the blood clot blocking wind pipes of lungs making it difficult to breathe without an oxygen tank or oxygenator. Pneumonia is often caused by infection with viruses or bacteria, by other microorganisms, or medications and conditions such as autoimmune diseases. Risk factors include lung diseases: cystic fibrosis, COPD, asthma, diabetes, heart failure, a history of smoking, inability to cough due such as following a stroke, or weak immune system. Diagnosis is based on symptoms and physical examination. Chest X-ray, blood tests and culture of  sputum may help confirm a diagnosis. The disease is classified by where it was acquired within community, hospital, health care associated pneumonia. Vaccine prevent some types of pneumonia, prevention methods include handwashing and not smoking. Treatment depends on the underlying cause. The pneumonia due to bacteria is treated with antibiotics. In bacterial pneumonia, the white blood cell count high but falls in severe cases. In viral mycoplasmapneumonia white cell count is low or normal but severe pneumonia cases hospitalized. Oxygen therapy is used if oxygen levels are low.

The warning signs and symptoms of a pulmonary embolism include:

  • Sudden shortness of breath
  • Chest pain or discomfort worsens when taking deep breath or cough
  • Feeling lightheaded, dizzy, fainting
  • Rapid pulse rates
  • Coughing up blood
  • Loss of appetite

Blood in Urine and some causes: 

The causes of gross hematuria are infection, trauma, kidney stones, cancer, blood cell disorders, some medications, and strenuous exercise. We do not know why strenuous exercise can cause blood leaking in the urinary tract, but it could be fluid balance (dehydration), blood cell breakdown, liver or bladder trauma. Treatment is by medication, drinking plenty of water to avoid infections.

People sometimes in certain extreme cases need the red blood clots removed surgically or medication, treatment by leaches work effectively. Blood thinning medication of aspirin or medical doctor prescribes medicines to treat patients. It must be treated urgently to stop lungs running out of air due to blocked clot as red blood clot in lungs causes shortage of breath or no blood circulation death. Respiratory circulatory system of blood clots produces blood poisoning from the decomposing blood matter. The blood is exchanged using centrifugal transfusion to replace coagulated blood. If it’s done early saves lives but delays of waiting for machine worsen patient’s survival. A patient must seek help early so as not to self – sabotage essential treatment for life because life is in the blood. IMG_20180627_101138

The widespread use of opioids to treat pain frequently prompts concerns about addiction and even deaths. So, why are these sometimes dangerous drugs still being given to patients? Much stronger than many of the other options, opioids are among the world’s most commonly prescribed painkillers. These drugs – including morphine, tramadol and fentanyl used to treat pain caused by everything from heart attacks to cancer has side effects. In the UK they were recently linked to the deaths of hundreds of elderly hospital patients, while the US is battling a well-documented opioid epidemic. Why not use other painkillers to avoid the risk of harm, addiction blood clots and breathing problems? These painkillers literally kill patients instead of alleviating excruciating pain. The triple harmful side-effects  cause personality changes, confusion, hallucination so patients become less active. Instead of helping ease people’s pain at the moment harming them. With huge bonuses paid for use of such  medications to pharmaceutical companies they are pushing it’s use more than safe non toxic options available.

A worldwide problem

Opioids work by combining with receptors in the brain to reduce the sensation of pain and they are highly effective. However, opioid receptors are present in areas of the brain responsible for breath control and high doses dangerously reduced rate of breathing as cause of almost all opioid deaths. Inquiry into Gosport said more than 450 people died between 1989 and 2000 from administration of “dangerous” amounts of opioids without medical justification. In US, increasingly widespread prescription of opioids to treat long-term pain led to epidemic addiction. In 2016, 11.5 million people in the US misused prescription opioids, and 42,249 died from overdoses. In England, GPs prescribed 23.8 million opioid-based painkillers in 2017 a rise of 10 million prescriptions since 2007. Since those with chronic pain require strong painkillers some are killed by overzealous use due to need to control excruciating pain and make patients comfortable. Those with sickle cell disease (SCD) have signs of the disease during the first year of life, around 5 months of age. Symptoms and complications of SCD are different for each person and can range from mild to severe pain. The reason infants don’t show symptoms at birth is because baby or fetal haemoglobin protects the red blood cells from sickling. When the infant is around 4 to 5 months of age, the baby or fetal haemoglobin is replaced by sickle hemoglobin and the cells begin to sickle. SCD is a disease that worsens over time. Treatments are available can prevent complications and lengthen lives of those who have this condition. The treatment options can be different for a person depending on symptom’s severity. Hydroxyurea (pronounced hye droks ee yoor EE a) is a medicine that can decrease several complications of SCD. This treatment is safe if given by medical specialists experienced in caring for patients with SCD. Side effects of taking hydroxyurea during pregnancy or for a long time are not completely known. The Food and Drug Administration approved a new medicine to reduce the number of sickle cell crises in adults and children older than age five; it is called L-glutamine. Another treatment, which can actually cure SCD, is a stem cell transplant (also called a bone marrow transplant); this procedure infuses healthy cells, called stem cells, into the body to replace damaged or diseased bone marrow (bone marrow is the center of the bone where blood cells are made). Although transplants of bone marrow or blood from healthy donors are increasingly used to successfully cure SCD, they require a matched donor (a person with similar, compatible bone marrow), and transplants sometimes cause severe side effects and occasional life-threatening illness or death. People with SCD and families should ask their doctors about benefits and risks of treatment options.

Sickle Cell Jaundice

Sickle cell jaundice bilirubin is released byproduct of red blood cells destroyed. The liver must process bilirubin to be excreted as bile into gut for digestion and passed out in the stools or urine. Jaundice occurs when there is too much bilirubin produced by too many red blood cells destroyed. The liver fails to process bilirubin in tummy so abdomen becomes swollen because of a build-up of fluid ascites. Liver and spleen may be enlarged plus unexcreted pile of dead red cells blocks passage of bile into gut. Jaundice disease is assessed and treated with significant symptoms of tiredness, ankle swelling, and also gastrointestinal bleeding, coma, confusion, ascites, etc. Clinical investigations show causes of jaundice increased bilirubin production increase of red blood cells destroyed. So haemolysis collection of blood in tissue red blood cell destroyed cause tiredness or lethargy called haemolyticanaemia. Failure of the liver to process bilirubin excretion diseases affects liver as viral infection, genetic diseases, excessive accumulation of chemicals (copper and iron. The disease Gilbert’s syndrome is a genetic disease causing jaundice by this method. Blockage of passage of bile into gut causes gallstones in bileduct of liver. Accumulation of gallstones requires the removal by surgery.

Jaundice Assessment

Complete jaundice assessment includes yellow eyes seen during clinical history, clinical examination, general or specific investigations. Review of clinical history and a complete routine medical history needs to be obtained. Medical history gives the causes of jaundice including pale stool, very dark urine, itchiness, gallbladder pain, tummy pain or others. A thorough general examination will be carried out specifically, liver and spleen should be felt for an enlargement. Other features include signs of anaemia lack of red blood cells in the body. A routine blood test checks of liver, blood system. The urine is tested to find exact cause in specific investigations by ultrasound for liver and tummy, CT of tummy, or direct visualisation of bile ducts in the tummy. A sample of liver tissue may be required for diagnosis in liver biopsy sometimes.

Treatment of Jaundiced Liver

Treatment of jaundice varies according to causes. A haematologist specialist in blood system, surgeon or physician is involved in treating causes of jaundice. Read more about liver and take care of yourself because the rate young people suffer from kidney disease is alarming. As a result some end up in Hospital on life support with kidney problems but can avert the menace of kidney disease.

TOP 6 CAUSES OF KIDNEY DISEASE:

1. Delay going to a toilet. Keeping your urine in your bladder for too long is a bad idea. A full bladder can cause bladder damage as urine in the bladder multiplies bacteria quickly. Once the urine refluxes back to the ureter and kidneys, the toxic substances can result in kidney infections, then urinary tract infections, nephritis, uremia and sepsis. When nature calls do it soon as you can.

2. Eating too much salt. You should eat no more than 5.8 grams of salt daily.

3. Eating too much meat. Too much protein in your diet is harmful for your kidneys. Protein digestion produces ammonia as a toxin very destructive to your kidneys. Too much meat than body needs equals more kidney damage.

4. Drinking too much caffeine. Caffeine is a component of many sodas and soft drinks. It raises your blood pressure and your kidneys start suffering. So you should cut down the amount of coke you drink daily.

5. Drinking water. Our kidneys should be hydrated properly to perform their functions well. If not drinking enough water the toxins can start accumulating in the blood, as there isn’t enough fluid to drain them through kidneys. Drink more than 10 glasses of water daily. An easy way to check if you are drinking enough water: look at the colour of your urine; the lighter the colour, the better.

6. Early treatment. Treat all your health problems quickly properly and have health checks regularly.  Help yourself God will protect you and your family from every disease.

(3) Avoid Tablets as very dangerous:
* D-cold
* Vicks Action-500
* Actified
* Coldarin
* Cosome
* Nice
* Nimulid
* Cetrizet-D
They contain Phenyl Propanol-Amide PPA causes strokes so banned in USA.

* Doctors in United States have found new cancer in human beings, caused by Silver Nitro Oxide. Whenever you buy recharge cards, don’t scratch with your nails, as it contains Silver Nitro Oxide coating and can cause skin cancer.

Important Health Tips:

1. Answer phone calls with the left ear.

2. Don’t take medicine with cold water.

3. Don’t eat heavy meals after 5pm.

4. Drink more water in morning, less at night.

5. Best sleeping time is 10pm to 4 am.

6. Don’t lie down immediately taking medicine or after meals.

7. If phone’s battery is low to last bar do not answer phone because radiation is 1000 times stronger. Knowledge is power.

Signs or symptoms of acute liver failure include:

  • Yellowing of skin and hands, feet
  • Yellow eyeballs jaundiced
  • Pain in upper right abdomen
  • Abdominal swelling
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • General sense of feeling sick unwell malaise
  • Disorientation or confusion
  • Sleepiness

When to see a doctor

Acute liver failure can develop quickly in an otherwise healthy person and life-threatening. If one suddenly developed yellowing of eyes or skin; tenderness in upper abdomen or unusual changes in mental state, personality or behaviour seek medical attention right away.dreamstime_s_73450142-356x187

Blood Cells & Blood Coagulation

Pluripotential cells in bone marrow differentiate into red blood cells, white cells and platelets. The Immune system  impacts red and white cells. And recent advances help understand coagulation in the heterogeneous group of diseases, thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anaemia thrombocytopenia platelet clumping in microcirculation ischemic organ dysfunction neurologic symptoms. Increased thrombosis was reported in different hemolytic anaemia (HA), particularly in sickle cell disease (SCD), and thalassemia. The different patho-physiologies, hemolysis have the procoagulant condition. The mechanism involves abnormal red blood cell (RBC) properties. And the increased plasma concentrations of microparticles and a release of cell-free haemoglobin RBC arginase result in impaired nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, increased blood concentration of oxidants, endothelial dysfunction. Major clinical consequence increase developing venous thrombosis, clinical sequelae of hemolysis symptom by NO depletion increased cell free plasma haemoglobin. Hemoglobinemia feature of the HA possibly contributing factor to explain clinical manifestation’s thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) characterized by microangiopathic HA and thrombocytopenia. The condition characterising intravascular hemolysis specific symptoms seen cell-free plasma haemoglobin sequalae. Conditions such as SCD and thalassemia syndromes and hemolytic conditions with substantial intravascular hemolysis. SCD, and the thalassemia represent common genetic disorders worldwide. Though different patho-physiologies, patients with both diseases share clinical manifestations, including thrombotic complications. So stroke in patients caused by large-vessel obstruction superimposed thrombosis, is one of the major complications in SCD. Pulmonary hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening complication in SCD, as documented by echo-cardiography (pulmonary artery pressure [PAP] > 30%) in approximately 30% adult patients with SCD screened. Autopsy showed evidence of new and old thrombi in pulmonary vasculature in up to 75% of SCD patients at the time of death. A recent report based on data by National Hospital Discharge Survey in U.S. shows patients with SCD younger than 40 years old had higher discharge diagnosis of pulmonary embolism than African Americans without SCD (0.44% vs 0.12% the prevalence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was similar. National In-patient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project of Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, from 2000 to 2001, reported SCD is a significant risk factor for pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism, with an odds ratio of 6.7 (95% confidence interval: 4.4–10.1. The thrombophilic status in SCD has been well documented as multifactorial, involving hemostatic changes, activation of the coagulation cascade and endothelial activation as shown by elevated levels of endothelial adhesion proteins (ICAM-1. ELAM-1,VCAM-1, von Willebrand factor [VWF] and thrombomodulin). Intimal hyperplasia was found in a variety of vascular beds, including pulmonary, renal, splenic, and placental vessels, and in arterioles adjacent to leg ulcers of patients with SCD. Most SCD-related complications said to be caused by the microvascular occlusion and ischemic tissue necrosis following adhesion of erythrocytes (RBCs) and other cellular elements to vascular endothelium. So clinical series describe occurrence of DVT, pulmonary embolism and portal vein thrombosis in patients with β-thalassemia major and β-thalassemia intermedia. In a recent survey of 8860 patients with β-thalassemia in the Mediterranean region and Iran, the overall prevalence of various thrombotic events was 1.65%, precisely 0.9% in thalassemia major and 4.0% in thalassemia intermedia. Was common in SCD, stroke was reported in patients with β-thalassemia major from Greece and Italy an incidence of 20% and 2%,  patients with β-thalassemia hemoglobin E (HbE) disease. Complication occurs commonly in the patients not regularly transfused. Evidence of asymptomatic brain damage reported by magnetic resonance imaging in patients with β-thalassemia intermedia and is inversely correlated with Hb level and increasing age. PAH is increasingly recognized as part of the clinical spectrum for adult β-thalassemia patients, with a frequency ranging from 10% to 74%; the overall higher rate in thalassemia intermedia. Regular transfusions thought to reduce the risk of thrombosis in thalassemia. In recent study, Singer et al found PAH in transfused patients with thalassemia major, most of whom splenectomized, suggesting regular transfusion does not prevent PAH, thrombotic complications. Several factors implicated pathogenesis of the hypercoagulable state, specific changes in lipid membrane composition of abnormal RBCs increased expression negatively charge phosphatidylserine outer surface. Postsplenectomy thrombocytosis, cardiac dysfunction, liver dysfunction lead to protein C and protein S reduction. Suggest inefficient spleen, hematologic hemolytic diseases contribute to an increased propensity to thromboembolic complications. Both β-thalassemia or sickle cell anemia, have a high proportion of patients without splenic function due to surgical splenectomy or due to functional hyposplenism. In a series of 83 patients with β-thalassemia intermedia followed for 10 years, 29% developed pulmonary embolism, DVT of lower extremities and portal vein thrombosis. Development of complications attributed to presence of high platelet counts after splenectomy. Moderate thrombocytosis in the older children, adults with SCA a consequent loss of splenic sequestration autosplenectomy in patients. Literature on relationship between splenectomy or autosplenectomy and thrombosis in SCA is scant. Specific features of thrombotic complications in patients with SCD and thalassemia share similar pathogenesis. Intravascular hemolysis is a common feature of both SCD and thalassemia. Recent evidence associates chronic intravascular hemolysis with a state of endothelial disfunction.

Red Blood Cells

The major stimulus to red blood cell (RBC) production erythropoetin, which is produced in the kidney. Anaemia is decrease in number or concentration of red blood cells amount of concentration of haemoglobin as a common inducer of erythropoetin production. It is not the number or concentration of RBCs that stimulates erythropoetin production, but decreased oxygenation of the blood. The number of red blood cells increase in chronic hypoxia as occurs in those who live at high altitudes. Effectiveness of the red blood cell in carrying oxygen depends on oxygen supply, number of red blood cells and health of red cells:

1) In aplastic anemia, the marrow as a whole is suppressed, by radiation or drugs. Red cells and other blood cells decrease in number (pancytopenia) in aplastic anemia.

2) Anaemia develops from significant blood loss.

3) If iron, an important ingredient of the haemoglobin molecule is deficient in the diet, the patient develops an iron deficiency anaemia. Iron is transported in blood by plasma protein transferrin, stored intracellularly on the protein, ferritin. Deficiency of transferrin results in an iron deficiency anaemia.

4) Vitamin Bu and folic acid important in synthesis of DNA, in development of RBCs from their precursor cells in the marrow. A deficiency of vitamin B12 or folic acid leads to megaloblastic anaemia in which the RBCs are large, fragile and short-lived. Intrinsic factor, produced by parietal cells in the gastric mucosa, normally combines with vitamin B12, protecting it from gastric digestion, and facilitates its transport across intestinal mucosal membrane. Lack of intrinsic factor, results in a megaloblastic anaemia (pernicious anaemia by failure of B12 absorption.

5) Defects in structure of haemoglobin may be responsible for the anemia. In sickle cell anemia, a recessive gene results in abnormal haemoglobin, which distorts the red cells into a sickle shape in states of low oxygenation. The RBC becomes very fragile, is short-lived, and can clog blood vessels. About 8% of the black population carries the gene. Individuals with the heterozygous state typically are normal, although sickling can occur in marked states of hypoxia. True sickle cell anemia, the homozygous state, occurs in about 0.3% of blacks.

Read more about treatment guidelines »

Hand-Foot Syndrome

Swelling in the hands and feet usually is the first symptom of SCD. This swelling, often along with a fever, is caused by the sickle cells getting stuck in the blood vessels and blocking the flow of blood in and out of the hands and feet. One is at a higher risk of developing blood clots when blood pools in the lower extremities. Elevating the feet and legs will allow veins to return blood to the heart more efficiently and thus reduce the chances of clotting. Those who expect to be bedridden for a long time, such as after surgery or an illness, should put blocks under the foot of a bed to elevate the legs, keeping them slightly higher than heart. Alternatively, placing pillows under one’s lower half will give the same result.

Treatment

The most common treatments for swelling in hands and the feet are pain medicine and an increase in fluids, such as water. Those going on long flight planning for surgery, or other actions that put them at risk for blood clotting, drinking plenty of water can reduce the chance of developing subsequent clots. Proper hydration prevents blood clots in a variety of ways; it increases fluid in blood vessels, diluting the ratio of blood cells and reducing viscosity, lowering risk of clotting. Additional liquid washes away irritants in bloodstream damaging endothelium and blood cells. Blood clot is natural response to damage, washing away toxins significantly lowers risk. Choose water over juices and sodas high sugar liquids leads to dehydration.

Do You Use the Emergency Department for Care of SCD?

Pain “Episode” or “Crisis”

Pain is the most common complication of SCD, and the number 1 reason that people with SCD go to the emergency room or hospital. When sickle cells travel through small blood vessels, they can get stuck and clog the blood flow. This causes pain that can start suddenly, be mild to severe, and can last for any length of time.

Prevention

There are simple steps that people with SCD can take to help prevent and reduce the number of pain crises, including the following:

  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Try not to get too hot or too cold.
  • Try to avoid places or situations that cause exposure to high altitudes (for example, flying, mountain climbing, or cities with a high altitude).
  • Try to avoid places or situations with exposure to low oxygen levels (for example, mountain climbing or exercising extremely hard, such as in military boot camp or when training for an athletic competition).
  • Adults with severe SCD can take a medicine called hydroxyurea to help reduce the number of pain crises.
    • People taking hydroxyurea are checked often by a doctor to prevent complications, including an increased risk of infections.
  • Research shows that babies and children with SCD can also benefit from hydroxyurea therapy.
Treatment

Most pain related to SCD can be treated with over the counter pain medications such as ibuprofen and aspirin. Some people who have severe pain are given opioid (i.e. morphine) medications daily, with additional pain medication. Some people may be admitted to the hospital for intense treatment.

Fast Fact

Taking iron supplements will not help people with sickle cell disease. This type of anemia is not caused by too little iron in the blood; it’s caused by not having enough red blood cells. In fact, taking iron supplements could harm a person with sickle cell disease because the extra iron builds up in the body and can cause damage to the organs.

Anaemia

Anaemia is very common complication of SCD. With SCD, the red blood cells die early. This means there are not enough healthy red blood cells to carry oxygen throughout body. When this happens, a person might have:

  • Tiredness
  • Irritability
  • Dizziness and lightheadedness
  • A fast heart rate
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Pale skin color
  • Jaundice (yellow color to the skin and whites of the eyes)
  • Slow growth
  • Delayed puberty
Treatment

Blood transfusions are used to treat severe anemia. A sudden worsening of anemia resulting from infection or enlargement of the spleen is a common reason for a transfusion. Multiple blood transfusions, however, might cause health problems because of the iron content of blood. Iron overload, called hemosiderosis, can damage liver, heart, pancreas and other organs, leading to diseases such as diabetes mellitus. Iron chelation therapy should be started in patients with SCD receiving regular blood transfusions to reduce excess iron levels. 

Nurse giving a little girl an immunization.

Infection

People with SCD, especially infants and children, are more at risk for infections, especially those due to bacteria with capsules because of damage to the spleen. Pneumonia is a leading cause of death in infants and young children with SCD.

Prevention

Vaccines can protect against harmful infections.

  • Washing your hands is one of the best ways to help prevent getting an infection. People with SCD, their family, and other caretakers should wash their hands with soap and clean water many times each day.
  • Because bacteria in some foods can be especially harmful to children with SCD, food should be prepared safely.
  • Vaccines can protect against harmful infections. Children with SCD should get all regular childhood vaccines, plus a few extra. Adults should have the flu vaccine every year, as well as the pneumococcal vaccine and any others recommended by a doctor.
  • Take penicillin (or other antibiotic prescribed by a doctor) every day until at least 5 years of age.

See a tip sheet on how to help prevent infection »

Treatment

Infections are treated with antibiotic medicines and sometimes blood transfusions. At the first sign of an infection, such as a fever, it is important to see a doctor right away as this may represent a medical emergency for people with SCD. Early treatment of infection can help prevent problems.

Chest x-ray

Acute Chest Syndrome

This can be life-threatening and should be treated in a hospital. Symptoms and signs are similar to pneumonia. Signs and symptoms include chest pain, coughing, difficulty breathing, and fever. Blood clot travels to lungs doctors call pulmonary embolism. Clots reach lungs if small is non-life threatening but smaller clots causes substantial damage to lungs. If clot is large, can stifle proper blood flow and become deadly, so quick treatment is essential. So most common symptom to look for is sudden shortness of breath; if individual is short of breath or lacks physical movement is suffering from pulmonary embolism. A condition causes patient to experience chest pain, breathing problems, heart palpitations. In some cases, a pulmonary embolism causes one to cough up blood as well.

Prevention

Adults with severe SCD can take a medicine called hydroxyurea to help prevent acute chest syndrome. People taking hydroxyurea monitored closely with regular blood testing and dose adjustments to prevent complications. A person on bed rest or recent surgery can use an incentive spirometer, also called “blow bottle,” to help prevent acute chest syndrome.

Treatment

Depending on cause, treatment might include oxygen, medicine to treat an infection, medicine to open up airways to improve air, and blood transfusions. Cut down on salts and fatty cholesterol because salt irritates endothelium or inner lining of veins and arteries. The blood vessels do not work efficiently in moving blood around body. This leads to blood pooling in lower extremities, where it is more likely to clot. Damage to endothelium makes blood cells more to stick to walls of vessels, increasing the risk of clots. Excessive salt intake is harmful to the cardiovascular system in a variety of ways, with blood clots one of the more significant risks. Decreasing salt intake, cutting out all canned and processed foods significantly reduces the risk of blood clots.

Splenic Sequestration

This can be life-threatening and should be treated in a hospital. It happens when a large number of sickle cells get trapped in the spleen and cause it to suddenly get large. Symptoms include sudden weakness, pale lips, fast breathing, extreme thirst, abdominal (belly) pain on the left side of body, and fast heartbeat.

Parents of a child with SCD should learn how to feel and measure the size of their child’s spleen and seek help if the spleen is enlarged.

Prevention

For those who have had a very severe, life-threatening episode of splenic sequestration or who have had many episodes in the past, it might be necessary to have regular blood transfusions or the spleen can be removed (called splenectomy) to stop it from happening again.

Treatment

Treatment typically is a blood transfusion. This should be done in consultation with a blood specialist as patients sometimes become overloaded with fluid when the blood is released from the spleen. Removal of blood may be necessary to prevent this happening.

Young girl getting eyes checked at the eye doctor

Vision Loss

Vision loss, including blindness, can occur when blood vessels in the eye become blocked with sickle cells and the retina (the thin layer of tissue inside the back of the eye) gets damaged. Some patients develop extra blood vessels in the eye from the lack of oxygen.

Prevention

People with sickle cell disease should have their eyes checked every year to look for damage to retina. If possible, this should be done by an eye doctor who specializes in diseases of the retina.

Treatment

If the retina is damaged by excessive blood vessel growth, laser treatment often can prevent further vision loss.

Leg Ulcers

This usually occurs on the lower part of the leg. They happen more often in males than in females and usually appear from 10 through 50 years of age. A combination of factors cause ulcer formation, including trauma, infection, inflammation, and interruption of the circulation in the smallest blood vessels of the leg.

Treatment

Leg ulcers can be treated with medicated creams and ointments. Leg ulcers can be painful, and patients can be given strong pain medicine. Management of leg ulcers could also include the use of cultured skin grafts. Treatment is provided in specialized centers. Bed rest and keeping leg or legs raised to reduce swelling helpful though not always possible.

Stroke

A stroke can happen if sickle cells get stuck in a blood vessel and clog blood flow to the brain. About 10% of children with SCD will have a symptomatic stroke. Stroke can cause learning problems and lifelong disabilities.

Prevention

Children who are at risk for stroke can be identified using a special type of exam called, transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD). If the child is found to have an abnormal TCD, a doctor might recommend frequent blood transfusions to help prevent a stroke. People who have frequent blood transfusions must be watched closely because there are serious side effects. For example, too much iron can build up in the body, causing life-threatening damage to the organs.

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) and Pulmonary Embolism (PE)

Sickling of red cells can increase blood coagulation and induce an increased risk of blood clot in a deep vein (DVT), or in the lung (PE) if the blood clot moves from the deep veins. People with SCD have a high chance of developing DVT or PE. DVT and PE can cause serious illness, disability and, in some cases, death.

Prevention and Treatment

Medication is used to prevent and treat DVT and PE. PE requires immediate medical attention. For more information on DVT and PE visit https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dvt/index.html.

Other Possible Complications

  • Damage to body organs (like the liver, heart, or kidneys), tissues, or bones because not enough blood is flowing to the affected area(s).
  • Malnutrition and growth retardation among adolescents can cause a delayed onset of puberty and, in males, infertility.
  • Gallstones.
  • Painful erection of the penis, called priapism, can last less than 2 hours or more than 4 hours. If it lasts more than 4 hours, the person should get urgent medical help. It can lead to impotence.
  • A very rare form of kidney cancer (renal medullary carcinoma) has been associated with sickle cell trait.

Links to Other Websites

Sickle Cell Disease Association of America

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Clinical Trials

Be The Match – Bone Marrow Transplantation

Reblogged as previously published

FOOD AND MENTAL HEALTH

dieta-alzheimer-272x300Whenever it comes to taking care of your mental health one of the first things to consider if you’re feeling down in the dumps, stressed, unfocused, or anxious is the food you eat. Yes, that’s right what you eat, how clean or well-oiled food is so to speak affects stomach and bowels and has a lot to do with your moods and how you feel on top of doing things in life. Shauna Faulisi, holistic nutritionist and founder of a Soul Wellness Method told Elite Daily the stomach is a second brain of your body with relationship to serotonin production neurotransmitters in the body that regulates moods and overall immunity. Faulisi adds this idea is one of the first things tackled when she meets with new clients. Foods eaten will either feed the good or bad bacteria affecting mental health. And nourishing food diets by taking probiotics noticed a major improvement in own emotional well-being when she started doing both of these things. It seems obvious, at least in some way how food affects mood but truly science exists behind it all experts, say not something to be ignored when it comes to taking care of mental health. In fact, it might be one of the first things to consider if you’re feeling down in the dumps, stressed, unfocused, or anxious.pic Sugar is often snuck into foods eaten so feeds the bad bacteria and wreak havoc on good. Alcohol, refined carbohydrates and processed food Faulisi recommends focusing on foods feeding good bacteria, above-ground vegetables or bone broth, sauerkraut examples. Concentrating on incorporating kinds of such foods into your diet, means “your body and mind thank you,” says Faulisi. Dr. Michael Wald, MD, DC, dietician and board certified nutritionist breaks down this whole food and mood idea more for us. The direct link between the health of intestinal tract and brain,” he tells Elite Daily is essential. Gut’s more serotonin than brain is a chemical responsible for good feelings important intestinal tract and nervous system functions. It’s anti-inflammatory helps to promote better sleep. Neuroscience says the healthier your gut is it shows result of foods you eat. The better chance your body has to produce feel-good chemicals to improve your overall mood.logicas_cerebrais_podem_pesar_na_balanca_1__2015-04-23160411

Whatever food is put into your mouth, she explains, is going to spend the next three days traveling through digestive tract, permeating intestinal walls to be absorbed into your body’s circulatory system and tissues. “Your overall health is significantly affected by what you eat, she tells Elite Daily. Dr. Trattner says the research really shows our guts are so sensitive and filled with impressionable nerves they are, indeed, as Faulisi said, often referred to as our second brain. “The digestive system doesn’t think for us, but it does play a key role in certain diseases and communicates with brain,” Dr. Trattner explains. So, along with the foods you eat, Dr. Trattner recommends making probiotics a regular part of your daily routine, avoid refined foods with lots of sugar, estrogens and fat. mental-health-and-nutrition-1-638 downloadTherefore keep away from all processed foods or at least make it a point to snack on them in moderation. You will notice boost in your mood and mind as result. The body of evidence linking diet and mental health is growing at a rapid pace as reports show level of mental health problems of eating fewer healthy foods. Fresh fruits, vegetables, organic foods and meals made from scratch are more healthy foods than the chips and crisps, chocolate, ready meals and takeaways. Food and mood, mind the mental health charity helps those with mental health problems to eat better good mood foods. Vegetables and fruit contain a lot of the minerals, vitamins and fibre we need to keep us physically and mentally healthy. Eating variety of the different coloured fruits and vegetables every day means you will get a good range of nutrients. Eating well for mental health says Royal College of Psychiatrists in health advice. Food-and-Mood-tips-for-your-mental-healthModern user-friendly evidence-based information on eating well, nutrition and mental health is produced by the Royal College of Psychiatrists. The link between food and mental health by the Psychological Association recommends good nutrition to improve your mental health. So put all this newfound foodie knowledge to the test next time you’re shopping for groceries, and pop a few of the recommended foods like fermented coconut yogurt, sauerkraut along with probiotics, into your basket. Growing research literature answers Western-style dietary habits in particular under special scrutiny. The modern high rate of depression says what you eat affects mental health. A large body of evidence existing confirms diet is as important to mental health as it is to physical health,” says Felice Jacka, the president of the International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research. “A healthy diet is protective and unhealthy diet is risk factor in depression anxiety.” So pay more attention to the food you eat to improve your mood and mental health.

 

SWEET POTATO FAVOURITES

1494-2TSweet potatoes are always a versatile, healthy option for breakfast; they’re loaded with fiber, nutrients, including beta-carotene, vitamins A and C, and antioxidants. Aside that, they can be grilled, baked, mashed and grilled. Another great way to enjoy sweet potatoes is to cook them into savory porridge. This delicious sweet potato recipe is perfect for cold weather; it’s a comfort food you can enjoy as breakfast or lunch, you only need few ingredients to make it tasty. To prepare sweet potato porridge see recipe for explanation.IMG_20180421_105154

Ingredients You Will Need

1. 5 medium sweet potatoes
2. 1 medium fish (mackerel or Salmon)
3. 5 medium tomatoes
4. 3 red bell peppers
5. 2 scotch bonnet peppers
6. 2 tablespoon ground crayfish
7. 2 stock cubes
8. 1 medium ginger
9. 1 chopped spring onion, ugu, spinach
10. 1 medium onion
11. 1-teaspoon turmeric powder
12. 1-teaspoon thyme
13. ¼ cup of peanut oilIMG_20180421_105130

Prepare Healthy Sweet Potato Porridge

1. Peel sweet potatoes, dice into medium sizes, rinse with water put into a pot.
2. Add water to cover the potatoes and place on heat to cook for 15 minutes.
3. As potatoes cook blend tomatoes with peppers, chop onion, spring onion.
4. Season and cook fish to extract rich stock, take out middle bones and shred the fish with a fork and set aside.
5. Once the sweet potatoes are cooked, drain from the liquid and set aside, add peanut oil in wide pot placed on heat.
6. Add chopped onions and ginger to the oil and fry for 30 seconds till fragrant.3757241
13845411547417. Add blended tomatoes to oil and cook for 10 minutes for the liquid to reduce.
8. Season tomato sauce with turmeric powder, stock cubes, salt, thyme, pepper Cook the sauce until thickens.
9. Bring boiled potatoes to sauce, stir properly, add shredded fish and spring onion/spinach, stir well to incorporate.
Leave the porridge to cook on low heat for 5 minutes. Take it off heat and serve it warm or as you desire.Chicken-Sweet-Potato-and-Black-Bean-Stew-2-694x1024

Directions

  • Prep Time: 5 mins
  • Cook Time:25 mins
  • Total Time:30 mins
  • Yield: 4-6

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 1 14-oz. can (small can) fire roasted diced tomatoes
  • 1 15-oz. can (small can) black beans, or 1.5 cups cooked black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 heaping teaspoon smoked paprika
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 small-medium sweet potatoes, diced (about 3-4 cups total)
  • 2 cups cooked shredded chicken (such as rotisserie)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, plus more for garnishSweet-Potato-Skins-recipe

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Place sweet potatoes on sheet tray and bake for 1 hour or until soft. Remove from oven and let stand till cool enough to handle. Split potatoes and remove the flesh to a medium sized bowl, reserving skins. In other bowl, add brown sugar, butter and cream cheese and the all of the spices and mash with fork or rubber spatula. Add butter and cream cheese mixture to the sweet potato flesh and fold in completely. Add the filling back to the potato skins and place on a half sheet tray. Bake for 15 minutes or until golden brown.

COCONUT OIL SUPER FOOD?

CoconutsCoconut oil classified is considered a superfood according toCoconut oil is high in saturated fatSales of coconut oil are rocketing, propelled by celebrity endorsements and claims that drinking the stuff will cure everything from halitosis to digestive disorders. Actress Angelina Jolie-Pitt is said to have a tablespoon or so with breakfast most mornings, while model Miranda Kerr says she not only adds it to salads and smoothies, but she cooks with it and splashes it on her skin as well. The health claims that swirl around coconut oil are treated with a great deal of scepticism by scientists. Coconut oil is seen, in the scientific community, as an unhealthy fat. It is very high in saturated fat (86%), even more so than butter (51%) or lard (39%). The reason that foods rich in saturated fats are frowned on is because eating them causes a rise in blood levels of LDL (low density lipoprotein). LDL is known as “bad cholesterol” because high levels are linked with increased risk of heart disease. On the other hand, saturated fats – which are particularly bad for you – also tend to raise HDL, “good” cholesterol, which has the opposite effect. It is possible that a particular food can raise overall cholesterol levels, yet still be heart-friendly.

Cholesterol check

So is coconut oil a cholesterol-busting wonder food, as some claim, or is this all dangerous hype? Despite all the sound and fury that surrounds coconut oil there have been surprisingly few human studies carried out to test specific health claims. So for the current BBC2 series of Trust Me I’m a Doctor, we thought we should help organise a trial. The Trust Me team started by contacting Prof Kay-Tee Khaw and Prof Nita Forouhi, both eminent Cambridge academics. With their help we recruited 94 volunteers, aged 50-75 and with no history of diabetes or heart disease, and designed a study to assess what effect eating different types of fat would have on their cholesterol levels. We began by randomly allocating our volunteers to one of three groups. Every day for four weeks, the first was asked to eat 50g of extra virgin coconut oil – that’s about three tablespoons full.

Type of oil or fat Polyunsaturated (%) Monounsaturated (%) Saturated (%)
Coconut oil 2 6 86
Butter 3 21 51
Lard 11 45 39
Goose fat 11 56 27
Olive oil 10 76 14
Rapeseed oil 28 63 7
Sesame oil 41 40 14
Corn oil 54 27 12
Sunflower oil 65 20 10

The second group was asked to consume the same amount of extra virgin olive oil. Olive oil is a key element of the Mediterranean diet, which is widely seen as being extremely healthy. And the third was asked to eat 50g of unsalted butter a day. Again, that adds up to just over three tablespoons. The volunteers were told that they could consume these fats in whatever way they pleased, as long as they did so every day for the whole four weeks. On the other hand others think that Coconut oil ‘as unhealthy as beef fat and butter’ so the Diet debate: Is butter back and is sat fat good? They were also warned that, because they were consuming an extra 450 calories a day, they might well put on some weight. Before our volunteers started on their new high-fat regime we took blood samples to get baseline measurements, focusing mainly on their levels of LDL (the “bad” cholesterol) and HDL (the “good” cholesterol) The importance of these two measures is that your heart attack risk is best calculated, not by looking at your total cholesterol score, but your total cholesterol divided by your HDL score. NHS Choices suggests that this figure should be below four. So what happened? As expected the butter eaters saw an average rise in their LDL levels of about 10%, which was almost matched by a 5% rise in their HDL levels Those consuming olive oil saw a small reduction, albeit a non-significant drop, in LDL cholesterol, and a 5% rise in HDL. So olive oil lived up to its heart-friendly reputation.Olive oil

Early Stages of Studies

But the big surprise was the coconut oil. Not only was there no rise in LDL levels, which was what we were expecting, but there was a particularly large rise in HDL, the “good” cholesterol, up by 15. On the face of it that would suggest that the people consuming the coconut oil had actually reduced their risk of developing heart disease or stroke. Olive oil is a key element of the Mediterranean diet, which is seen as particularly healthy. I asked Prof Khaw, who was clearly surprised by these results, why she thought it had happened. “I have no real idea,” she candidly replied. “Perhaps it is because the main saturated fat in coconut oil is lauric acid and lauric acid may have different biological impacts on blood lipids to other fatty acids. The evidence for that comes mainly from animals, so it was fascinating to see this effect in free-living humans.” So should we be hailing coconut oil as a health food? “I think decisions to eat particular oils depend on more than just the health effects” she said. “This is just one study and it would be irresponsible to suggest changing dietary advice based on one study, however well conducted.” This was a very short-term study and compared to olive oil, research on coconut oil is at an early stage. So the claims about coconut oil being a superfood are premature. But if, like me, you enjoy putting coconut in your curries, there seems no very good reason to stop.

The new series of Trust Me I’m a Doctorcontinues on BBC2 at 20:30 GMT on Wednesday 10 January and will be available on iPlayer afterwards.

DEPRESSED MUMS SINGING

Mum singing to babySinging speeds up’ recovery from post-natal depression. Singing helps mothers recover from post-natal or post partum depression more quickly study suggests. Researchers found women who took part in group singing sessions with their babies experienced much faster improvement in their symptoms than those who did not. The study, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, looked at 134 mothers with post-natal depression. Early recovery is seen to be crucial to limit effects on mother and baby. Post-natal depression is estimated to affect one in eight new mothers. And previous studies have indicated singing can help improve the mental health of older people and those with dementia, but this is the first controlled study of its effect on post-natal depression. The women were placed into three groups:Mother and baby music group
  • one took part in group singing
  • another took part in in creative play sessions
  • a third group received their usual care, which could include family support, antidepressants or mindfulness

The singing workshops saw the mothers learning lullabies and songs from around the world with their babies and creating new songs together about motherhood. And those with moderate to severe symptoms of post-natal depression reported a much faster improvement than mothers in the usual care and play groups. All the groups improved over the 10 weeks, but in the first six weeks, singing group already reported an average 35% decrease in depressive symptoms. The Principal investigator Dr Rosie Perkins said the study, although small, was significant because it was important to tackle the symptoms as quickly as possible. “Post-natal depression is debilitating for the mothers and their families. As research indicates some women think accessible singing with their baby helps speed up recovery at one of the most vulnerable times of their lives,” she said. The lead author Dr Daisy Fancourt at University College London, said singing is another useful therapy to offer women. babies with musical instrumentsMany mothers have concerns about taking depression medication whilst breast-feeding and uptake of psychological therapies with new mothers is relatively low,” she said. “These results are really exciting as suggests something as simple as referring mothers to this community activities could support their recovery.” Dr Trudi Seneviratne, who chairs the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ Perinatal Faculty, said: “It’s exciting to hear about the growing evidence base for novel psychosocial interventions like singing to facilitate a more rapid recovery for women with post-natal depression. “I look forward to more work in this area in the future, as it will be enjoyed by both mothers and their babies.”Since the study, Breathe Arts Health Research has started running singing workshops in partnership with the Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust for women with post-natal depression across the south London boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark. Community and socialising helps overcome isolation and loneliness of new mothers. The feel good factor of singing with the babies is definitely a win- win situation lifting the mood and going out of the home helps to lift their spirit too. Isolated mothers can organise own singing sessions with friends in communities and their babies benefit too from a calm, happy, relaxed mother. If child raising is recognised or considered as a valid hardwork and to celebrate mothers and carers the world will become a better and safer place. So families must be prioritised and to help mother’s like Finland pays both parents to raise their children. Depression is caused by loneliness, pressure, stress of modern living without extended family support and children become depressed too. So it is good news to help mother’s and also to improve motherhood as an honourable collaboration with God’s idea to multiply to replenish the earth.

AN AMAZING WEIGHT LOSS

Among many people’s priority resolution for the new year is the desire to lose weight. An amazing weight loss plan used by this man transformed his life to shed the extra pounds of weight in a short time. So there is hope for many more people to follow his example to lose weight too. The father-of-two lost 12 stones in under a year in remarkable weight loss effort attributed to low calorie diet. Lorry driver Adam Moffat, 44, sheds half his body mass after adjusting eating habits. The Independent Online shared this story of Adam Moffat with his wife Margaret and daughters Hannah, 13, and Holly, nine Katielee pictured here by Arrowsmith /SWNS. The father-of-two is now half the size of the man he used to be after shedding more than 12 stone in less than a year. Prior to shedding half his body weight Adam Moffat, 44, gorged on pies, cakes and daily double rolls crammed with sausages. He would scoff cakes with breakfast and lunch and would even sneak in a kingsize Mars bar before dinner.