HOPE THRU VALENTINE TIME

wp-1580499421456.jpgValentine time brings joy for married and single lovers celebrating love life but its also one of the saddest times for some people struggling in relationships.  It is often said festive seasons can affect people’s love life causing rift or damage. In such times is necessary to have hope and first count all your blessings despite adversity going through. It will surprise what the LORD has done in your life so thank God and be grateful for your life. 20200206_121949Write down good times in your life you felt most happy within yourself and felt good about yourself. What made you so happy and content you felt life is good and wonderful? When you felt happy can you recall how you celebrated those times. Did your happiness last long or did you self sabotage by indulgence that ruined the moment and you regret loss?20200206_122049How did you bounce back in the past when you felt hopeless and thought all was lost? What did you do to pick yourself up to start all over again? Did you learn from your experience to grow wiser or repeated same problems over and over again although you vowed never again! What changed inside your heart, mind, feelings and emotions about yourself? 20200206_122332Are you honest with yourself in all your choices or decision making to think of a good outcome for yourself first so to be able to stay strong without compromise. We are not talking about the “love tank” syndrome of shifting responsibilities of your life to be “filled” by another person all the time. It is impossible, unrealistic to expect your life to be lived through a person demanding same from you void of fulfilled genuine love and affection. wp-1580750543586.jpgTina Turner song says what has love got to do with it?  To expect love life to face no challenges and no uphill struggles is delusion causing pain of dissatisfaction. Life is tough so demanding perfection in a relationship of two people adjusting in a couple’s life is insanity driving people crazy. There is no such thing as perfect families though grass seems greener it’s a different story on a closer look. IMG-20200206-WA0007Changing circumstances in relationship can be shocking so cause anger, hatred bitterness and disappointment because if unmet needs or expectations. Its good to know NO SINGLE INDIVIDUAL is able to fulfil your entire life exclusively. This is why no wo/man is an island everyone in your life is put there by God for these reason to build you up and to encourage you. Do not cut yourself off from family or loved ones in the name of love it is a coercive controlling behaviour abuse.wp-1580750500770.jpgRecall the good times of personal joy of things you DID BY YOURSELF and made your life happy and feel fulfilled. Loving yourself FIRST is a command: Going for walk, read a book, listening to favourite music, write a story, visit, invite friends over, don’t isolate yourself. Meet up in a public place with friends, swim go for massage in reputable place, do not wait for people to validate or tell you what to do. Do not think a damaged relationship means your life is destroyed beyond the repair of your circumstances. Although you may feel sad, recall past times you overcame and recovered your life. You seem better than before so what doesn’t kill you makes you STRONGER and WISER. Avoid repeating mistakes to lose precious time, waste money to miss friends, family, lose houses and lands, family but remember Creator God owns people not you. God restores a hundred times the loses in life and in life after no matter how wonderful your love life is you will account to God for your life, abilities, gifts, skills, God given talents. Its God who gives POWER  to get wealth to eat is a gift from God so look to God your maker your Source of life. Don’t put anyone on a pedestal above God in your life. Celebrate the people in life in your life and remember to celebrate yourself too. Do not abandon your life to be controlled by anyone its not love, its coercive abuse Stockholm syndrome.

AUSCHWITZ TRUELIFE STORY

Survivors of Auschwitz leave through the infamous gates of Auschwitz I after the liberationAuschwitz true life story of death camps of Nazi Holocaust liberated 27 January by Soviet troops in 1945. On 27 January 1945, Soviet troops cautiously entered Auschwitz. Primo Levi – one of the most famous survivors – was lying in a camp hospital with scarlet fever when the liberators arrived. The men cast glances at the sprawling bodies, at the battered huts and at us few still alive”, he would later write. “They did not greet us, nor did they smile; they seemed oppressed not only by compassion but by… the feeling of guilt that such a crime should exist.” “We saw emaciated, tortured, impoverished people,” soldier Ivan Martynushkin said of liberating the death camp. “We could tell from their eyes that they were happy to be saved from this hell. In less than four years, Nazi Germany systematically murdered at least 1.1 million people at Auschwitz. Almost one million were Jews. Those deported to the camp complex were gassed, starved, worked to death and even killed in medical experiments. The vast majority died in the Auschwitz II death camp is Auschwitz-Birkenau. Six million Jewish people died in Holocaust Nazi campaign to ‘eradicate’ Europe’s Jewish population. Auschwitz was at the centre of the antiSemitic and eugenics genocide of those not of Aryan stock.

What was the Holocaust?

When the Nazis came to power in 1933 they began to strip Jewish people of all property, freedoms and rights under the law. After the German invasion and occupation of Poland in 1939, the Nazis started deporting Jewish people from Germany and Austria to Poland, where they created ghettos to separate them from the rest of the population. In 1941, during German invasion of USSR, the Nazis began campaign of extermination in earnest. Nazis spoke about their invasion as a race war between Germany and Jewish people, as well as the Slavic population and the Roma.Groups of German Einsatzgruppen soldiers out across newly conquered lands in Eastern Europe to massacre civilians. By the end of 1941, they had killed 500,000 people, and by 1945 they had murdered about two million – 1.3 million of whom were Jewish. Behind lines, Nazi commanders experimenting with ways to kill en masse. They feared shooting people too stressful for their soldiers, came up with more efficient means of murder. Experimental gas vans had been used to kill mentally disabled people in Poland as early as 1939. Poisonous fumes were pumped into a sealed compartment to suffocate those inside. By the winter of 1941, the Nazis had constructed gas chambers at Auschwitz. Nazi leaders met in January 1942 to coordinate industrial slaughter. At Wannsee Conference, as it became known, they agreed to what they called a “final solution to the Jewish question” – killing the entire European Jewish population, 11 million people, by extermination and forced labour.

What was Auschwitz?

Auschwitz was originally a Polish army barracks in southern Poland. Nazi Germany invaded and occupied Poland in September 1939, and by May 1940 turned the site into a jail for political prisoners. This area with the infamous lie Arbeit Macht Frei written above the entrance in German meaning work sets you free became known as Auschwitz I.But as war and Holocaust progressed the Nazi regime greatly developed the site. The first prisoners to be gassed were a group of Polish and Soviet prisoners in August 1941. Work began on a new camp, Auschwitz II-Birkenau, the following month. This became site of huge gas chambers where hundreds of thousands murdered until November 1944, and crematoria was where their bodies were burned. German chemicals company IG Farben built and operated a synthetic rubber factory at Auschwitz III-Monowitz. Other private companies like Krupp and Siemens-Schuckert also ran factories nearby, to use prisoners as slave labour. Both Primo Levi and Nobel Prize winner Elie Wiesel survived Monowitz concentration camp. When Auschwitz was eventually liberated, it had more than 40 camps and subcamps.

How Auschwitz worked?

People from all over Europe crammed into cattle wagons without windows, toilets, seats or food, and transported to Auschwitz. There they were sorted into those who could work and those to be immediately killed. The latter group were ordered to strip naked and sent to  showers for “delousing” – a euphemism used for the gas chambers.

The gas chamber at Auschwitz IGuards used Zyklon B pellets to murder people in gas chamber. Nazis cremated victims in ovens.Crematorium ovens at AuschwitzGuards from “Hygienic Institute” drop powerful Zyklon-B gas pellets into the sealed chambers, and wait for people to die. It took about 20 minutes. The thick walls could not hide screams of those suffocating inside. Sonderkommandos – other prisoners, usually Jews forced to work for guards or killed would remove artificial limbs, glasses, hair and teeth before dragging corpses to incinerators. Ashes of the bodies were buried or used as fertiliser. Belongings of those gassed and those sent to work were taken for sorting in a part of the camp known as “Canada” so named because country was seen as a land of plenty.

Who were the victims?

SS guards sought to hide their crimes as Soviet troops closed in tried to destroy their extensive prisoner records making it hard to fully quantify the number of victims. Academic studies since agree that in total close to 1.3 million people arrived at Auschwitz. About 1.1 million of them died there. Jews from all across Nazi-controlled Europe made up the vast majority of the victims. Almost one million Jewish people were murdered at Auschwitz. One specific example was Hungary’s Jewish population. In the space of just two months, between May and July 1944, Hungary transported 420,000 Jewish people to Auschwitz.Hungarian Jews arriving at Auschwitz in June 1944So many Hungarian Jewish people were killed in such a short time that victims’ bodies were dropped in pits near the camp and burned. Tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews were sent to Auschwitz every day. Three quarters of them were killed on arrival. 75,000 Polish civilians, 15,000 Soviet prisoners of war, 25,000 Roma and Sinti, as well as Jehovah’s Witnesses, homosexuals and political prisoners were also put to death by the German state at the Auschwitz complex.

Auschwitz Is liberated

German authorities ordered a halt to gassing and the destruction of the gas chambers and crematoria in late 1944, as Soviet troops advanced westward. The stockpile of stolen valuables in the Canada sector was shipped to Germany shortly afterwards. Determined to erase evidence of their crimes, Nazis ordered tens of thousands remaining prisoners to march west to other concentration camps, such as Bergen-Belsen, Dachau and Sachsenhausen. Those too sick to walk were left behind all who fell behind on the march were killed. Soviet forces found a few thousand survivors when they entered the camp on 27 January 1945, along with hundreds of thousands of clothes and several tonnes of human hair. Soldiers later recalled having to convince some survivors that the Nazis had truly gone. Elie Wiesel later said in a speech to mark the 50th anniversary of the liberation that the Nazi crimes at Auschwitz “produced a mutation on a cosmic scale, affecting man’s dreams and endeavours.” “After Auschwitz, the human condition is no longer the same. After Auschwitz, nothing will ever be the same.”

The anti-Semitic Law watchdog wants:

  • Stop anti-Semitism hatred policy
  • Engage staff in respect for people
  • Assess workplace risk deal with it
  • Report antiSemitic joke and insults
  • Teach people on holocaust damage
  • Deal with antiSemitic complaints
  • Know antiSemitism is a crime
  • Don’t torelate antiSemitic harassment
  • God blesses you if you bless Jews

More on this story

  • Video The young Holocaust survivor interviewed by the BBC
    19 April 2018

SHOE GIVING JOY IN AFRICA

Ian Payne with shoe donationsIan Payne noticed conditions of runners’ shoes when he started a running group in Kampala. When staff sergeant Ian Payne moved his family from the UK to Uganda for work, little did he know that he would also embark on a journey of generosity. For the past eight months Ian has been on secondment at the High Commission of Uganda in the capital Kampala. He started a running group at a local boxing club and saw condition of the runners’ shoes. “I looked down and saw the boys’ shoes were in a bad way,” says Ian, who is originally from London. Felt fortunate for myself and my family but very sad inside as I could see poverty and I did not like it. Yet they were smiling and happy getting on with life, humbled me and I wanted to help.Boxing club member with shoesA young boxing club member receiving a pair of trainers. Ian thought about the number of shoes he no longer wore and quickly decided to donate his shoes. He enlisted help of friends and family to give away their spare shoes too. When I received them kitted out guys but had loads of shoes left over, says Ian who is part of the Adjutant General’s Corps in the British Army. Ian stops at a roadside to give trainers to youngsters. When he drives out of Kampala for business, Ian says he sees many people walking on roads with no shoes. “Out west it’s really bad,” he said. I keep shoes at the back of my vehicle if I see people without shoes, I pull over and give them a pair.wp-1578331833242.jpg Faces light up given shoes that arrived Ian thought of where he could donate them, visited the local orphanage giving dozens of shoes to children. Joy makes a difference, evident straightaway. Seeing their faces light up, they are so happy to receive something that seems simple to us. Many dropped to their knees saying ‘God bless you’, and praying.” When Ian posted appeal for shoe sharing on social media, the response was huge. So some people have contacted him saying they have created shoe collection stations in their local areas. Ian’s colleagues on the operational tours send donations. Many people sent shoes that have hardly been worn and are in good condition. Others may be old but are better than no shoes.Boxes of shoes in lorrySo far, Ian has received the majority of donations from the UK, but he has had interest from other parts of the world from Cyprus to the US. Its snowballed a social media response,” says Ian. “It is like a full-time job replying to messages. It started with trainers has expanded to any kind of shoes although don’t accept high heels! Its not convenient for long distance walks and types of jobs done. He says people also wanted to send him clothes but it was just him handling all the donations. I’m a one-man band but I recently asked my daughters to help me. Ian wants to take the trainers to more schools, particularly in rural areas. Ian wants to go to more schools orphanages particularly in rural areas where he has identified a need for shoes, for children. I really can’t stress enough how grateful they are to receive a pair of shoes,” he says. “Yet I still feel saddened as I barely scratched surface and so much more can be done.” African weather is so hot you can fry egg on stone. The sunshine heats earth bakes the feet and thorns prick soles of the feet.wp-1578395647559.jpg

PEEKABOO JESUS MOMENTS

wp-1578310280677.gifLast night Jesus appeared in the clouds and looked at us but didn’t say anything as we shouted Jesus. The looked like He just wants to show up to comfort people though Jesus is higher up from us in the heaven connects with us on earth. Then it was if He was playing peekaboo game with as He goes behind the clouds and then He shows Himself again and again.wp-1578310305448.gifThe second time a woman shouts, Jesus pointing at Him. We saw Him again the third time towards the right side of sky Jesus and surprised us getting out from behind clouds and resurfaces again as if playing a game of peekabo with us. He said nothing at all in the three times He showed up on same night a few minutes so saw us looking at Him and I woke up.wp-1578310384411.gifOften in crucial times Jesus shows up to reassure people He is aware of things going on earth so is in control despite circumstances of life. In these situations it is encouraging to see Jesus appear in dream in a sombre and playful manner. Didn’t have to say anything showing up is good enough for us. Gospels have the red letter words of Jesus Christ in Bible containing the GOOD NEWS message of Jesus to mankind.wp-1578310337242.gifA silent Jesus golden moment meeting sometimes like the quiet Quakers let the Holy Spirit manifest presence. God said be still and know I AM God so in silence and quietness is your confidence. Word of God says, “there is time to speak and time to be silent.” There are occasions in life we are so surprised that we become speechless. Silent interactions becomes the best priceless moments experienced by eye contact or silent embrace, a hug enjoying moment or just being present.wp-1578328584313.jpgA picture speaks a thousand words so to see each other face in face in the dream is amazing and wonderful. Joy of seeing Jesus knowing we are in His  Presence satisfies longing of our hearts to see our Lord again. Jesus intervenes on behalf of mankind so will come for Christian believers in Christ in Rapture imminent, but only God knows exact day, time and hour planned. Life is changing fast God is moving shaking things in the world.  Events happening in the world in Bible in Daniel 9-12 predicted sealed for such a time as this. Be sure you belong to God in Christ and your name  in book of life.

 

HAVE A BLESSED NEW YEAR

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DR. EPHRAIM KWAKU AMU

wp-1577717343772.jpgDr Ephraim Kwaku Amu was a famous Ghanaian composer, musictechnologist and teacher. He was born, 13 September 1899 at Peki-Avetile or Abenase in Peki in the Volta Region a male child born on Wednesday, Kwaku. His father Stephen Amuyaa Papa Stenafo was woodcarver, mother Sarah Akoram Ama. Ephraim was baptised by Rev. Rudolf Mallet, 22 October 1899. Amu in May 1906 aged 12 at the Peki-Blengo E.P. Boarding Middle School shows his interest in music and agriculture. Enjoyed music played in church by Mr Karl Theodore Ntem who played organ. Amu’s teacher of music on organ in return for work on Mr Ntem’s farm on Saturdays taught him  music he loved and did agriculture. In 1915/16 year, Amu passed the standard 7 School Leaving Certificate and Abetifi teachers Seminary Exams. With others walk 150 miles from Peki to Abetifi with boxes on head to start teacher training education. They rest at Koforidua, and NkawkawAsubone and Obomen. In college joined 25 others, Amu saw some students classmates had steel bicycles built his own bicycle from wood carved from a wooden slab in the bush near college.wp-1577730979485.jpgwp-1577717366195.jpgwp-1577719597840.jpgwp-1577717355385.jpgwp-1577717377384.jpgThe students discovered his handiwork named it Amu. It is on record the son of Swiss principal, Stern, enjoyed rides on Amu wooden cycle. Amu’s ingenuity led to carved wooden balls for their school games, which replaced imported balls used at the seminary. Amu completed his four-year teacher-catechist training in 1919. Newly graduating as a teacher-catechist, was one of the two preachers selected in the pulpit on behalf of fellow mates to preach to express appreciation to the tutors and townsfolk. The sermon was an assessment of the quality of the theological training offered to students. Amu chose sermon text from Matthew 25:40 for occasion themed, “the LORD will thank you for all the good you do for HIS little ones.” Amu used Twi and Ewe in his short sermon. Amu is known for his use atenteben, Ghanaian bamboo flute he promoted and popularized the instrument throughout the country, and composed music for it. Amu composed “Yen Ara Asase Ni” -This is our own land a nationally acclaimed patriotic song is performed at national functions.wp-1577717331895.jpgIn 1926 Amu transferred on promotion to the Presbyterian Mission Seminary at Akropong on recommendation of the Synod Committee of the Eʋe Presbyteria Hame. At Akropong, in his new ways of doing things, actions, ideas, unorthodox. In charge of gardening request students to use waste to manure college farm the students unpleased it was a taboo for an educated man to waste. Proved example carried waste to college farm ahead of unwilling students. Dr. Ephraim Amu employed no one to sweep his rooms, wash his plates or run errands for him. No manual work too menial or hard for him, believed in using African cultural artefacts and good African technological and social inventions. He preferred title Owura to “mister” prefix to his name. Dr Ephraim Amu selected Twi names for four new college dormitories completed in 1929. On request from Mr Ferguson Principal of Akropong Training college, Amu came out with a solfa and notation of street song “Yaa Amponsa” set to his own chaste words. His students enjoyed the new song, melody and new words. The street ballad Yaa Amponsa, popular with great appeal and appreciation.wp-1577717317363.jpgAmu learnt to speak correct Akuapem Twi from the members of his Akropong Church singing band who specialised in Amu’s type of African music during the period he led and taught the group. In 1927, inspired by the contents of Wasu, a journal published by the West African Students’ Union, Amu decided he would wear African dress with pride. So not to wear warm those unsuitable European clothes in the tropical Africa. He made efforts to make Christian church service meaningful to African worshippers who were ashamed of their African clothing, language, music or their African names. As part of his ingenuity and creativity Amu introduced bamboo odurogyaba, odurogya and atɛtɛnbɛn. In 1931 after Amu preached wearing African attire on Sunday, he was summoned to appear before the church court. Rev. Peter Hall told Amu, “We were taken aback to see you conduct a Sunday service in native cloth hope you will not do this again.” Amu in his polite manner took leave of the church session but decided in his heart to continue to work in the church as a catechist and music teacher than to become minister of the Gospel to accept wearing unsuitable European dress. In June 1942, Amu married Beatrice Yao and presented a wooden box made of the finest wood instead of an imported steel trunk to his bride. Dr Amu married at the age of 43 on 3 September 1942.wp-1577718179380.jpgDr Amu drove a truck almost similar to this with metal frames he drove around. On Saturday, 27 March 1965, University of Ghana conferred honorary degree of Doctor of Music on Ephraim Amu at University of Ghana, Legon. An Ephraim Amu Foundation was founded in 1995 launched in 2004 in his honour. Blessed to know Dr Ephraim Amu and visited his hometown to attend his son and his daughter in law friend whose wedding we attended. We knew Dr Ephraim Amu for five years in visits to his beautiful home. He is one of the great Pan African pioneers who did his part for Africa quietly in humility allowing his music and lifestyle to speak for itself. As the Ghanaians say, “a good quality product sells itself” without any attempt of spin doctor bulldozing inferior item sold. Dr Ephraim Amu did his best in life left his wonderful legacy of promoting African music, drum cultural values important to him. Dr Amu Day is celebrated as global icon ambassador of African costume culture, music, drums, organic agricultural production. He led by example, so extremely hardworking and it is a privilege to personally meet and know Dr Ephraim Amu’s works of music. He is acknowledged on currency of Ghana as a citizen who stood up for his country and traditions. Above all he loved God as a living testimony for all to see in humility to the Glory of God. Too young to fully understand or appreciate his Pan African cultural views, grateful and thankful for his life as Ho Technical college renamed after Dr Ephraim Amu.wp-1577727243415.jpgDr Amu’s music is underway by Galaxy Music imprint of ECS publishing Group, released three titles introducing non-Ghanaian choirs to his work to stir up interest in the wider corpus. A quarter of Dr Amu’s works is published in five collections out of print. Though some scores missing, autograph manuscripts fill most of void but are unpublishable. With his daughter Misonu Amu is being developed into a new edition of Amu’s scores through a process of comparing primary sources published and versions of audio recordings in consultation with Ghanaian members of team intimately familiar with Amu’s music performance practice. This new six-volume of critical performance edition will present works according to voicing. Thirty titles per volume organized as follows: 1-3) three volumes SATB scores, 4) A volume TTBB scores 5) Volume unison/duet/trio work 6) one volume instrumental pieces. Amu held students’ interest teaching simple African tunes and rhythms studied and adapted the popular traditional African dance, song. Amu also studied Western music and traditional African Music. He studied European Music: Bach, Mozart, Hadyn and other Masters. Amu before hid studies at the Royal College of Music London 1937 had a solid foundation in theory and practice of music. He studied harmony, counterpoint, orchestration, piano, composition of musician Herbert Howells and Gordon Jacob. Amu’s music studies in Europe prepared his musical career in Gold Coast, Ghana. wp-1577717343772.jpgDr Ephraim Kwaku from 1940, for fifty years led contemporary Ghanaian Art Music active musical life in Ghana. He established a Government Music School at Achimota and a Faculty member of University of Science and Technology, Kumasi. Established Music Department Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana at Legon as Senior Research Fellow from 1962-1971 then retired. Amu’s career created the National Orchestra of classical music in Ghana. The National Theatre, National Choir honoured Ephraim Amu, on his ninety- fifth birthday. Choir, conducted by Mrs. Dinah Reindorf performed the works by Amu. Amu’s music is classified into three distinct styles: Early period (1920-1937), middle period (1937-1951), third period (1952-1996). Early work is simple diatonic chords. Songs use duple, triple effect patterns: Biakoye (Unity), Israel Hene (King of Israel), Abibirimma (African Sons) Akwaabadwon (Welcome Song Hail Victors). Middle period works polyrhythmic polyphonic textures show fine music. Amu’s polyphonie textures in Ghanaian languages foundation for his works: Adawura Bome (Play for Me). Akyede Pa Mafo (Giver of Good Things). Amu’s works melo-rhythmic idiom of instrument music effective in writing songs vocals: Adawura Bome  (S.A.T.B.) (Play For Me) percussion rhythm gong and drum of sounds as kon kon kon and pete pete pete.’ Hyiawu hunters’ song. Alegbegbe…(God Loves World). Amu’s music preserves and reflects the linguo-musical dialect music to make culture relevant to Ghanaian music composed, collected and studied.wp-1577717343772.jpgDr Ephraim Kwaku 1958 plays bamboo flutes seprewa, atenteben, instruments developed so standardised. Akan drums atumpan and fontom in his works. His Agyinamoa Wou (demise of cat), scored to bamboo flute ensemble of Atenteben of piano. Amu provides the foundation for composers to contribute to growth sustains Ghanaian mix European music. Ethnomusicologists combine the strong academic interest in music styles. Amu’s vision influence composer’s integration of European African music element and relevant African ethnomusicology helps to understand his music distinguished by his career. Eweland music of Amu’s Asafo Ghanaian war set to Fante tunes of worship in church. Highlife popular West African music origin in Ghana use European- diatonic harmonics emphasis raised to the supertonic minor seventh, modulation dominant African rhythm. Percussive rhythm, parallel harmonics in thirds or sixths; melodic line pattern of texts, non-lexical syllables harmonic and rhythmic effects. ASεM YI DI KA Dr. E. Amu Art Music Ghanaian elements mix native with the European culture: Israel Hene (King of Israel) Odumayefo Ibrefo (Tiresome worker) Awurade Otumfo Kese (Our Great LORD) Onipa dawohoso (Be on guard) Yen Wura Jesu Anim Obi Nni Ho (None like Jesus) Wope Onyame Asenoa (To be like God) Akwaabadwon (Welcome victors) Hyiawu (Hunters’ song) Adawura borne (Play for me) Alegbegbe Mawu lɔ Xexeame (God loves world) Abibirimma (Sons of Africa) Tete Wobika  (proclaim) Nenyo De Wo Dede (Perfection) Mo koso So Mforo (Keep climbing) Onyame Ne Sahene (God Captains our host) Biakoye (Unity) Asafo (War music). Bonwere Kentenwene (Bonwere weave) Mawue Naa Me, Mawue Tea Me (God gives, God withholds) Akyede Pa Mafo (Giver of good things) Yen Ara Asase Ni (This is our land) Enne Ye Anigye Da (Its a joyful day) Ennye Yen Nyame (Not to us O LORD) Sam Befa (Collect what you left behind) Asem Yi Di Ka (Prime talk).wp-1577717410363.jpgUnited Nations must set 13th September Dr Amu International Pan African Day to be observed by the United Nations. It is important to designate specific day as occasion to mark events, topics in order to promote awareness and action of his objectives of the Organization. Member States propose observance and General Assembly to establish by resolution his contribution to music. Celebrations by specialized agencies of United Nations UNESCO, UNICEF, FAO this issues within their scope by the General Assembly.

Works by Ephraim Amu:

  • Amu, Ephraim. Twenty-five African Songs in the Twi Language. Music and words by E. Amu. Sheldon Press, 1932.
  • Amu, Ephraim. Amu choral works. Waterville Publishing House, 1993.
  • Amu, Ephraim. How to Study African Rhythm. The Teachers’ Journal (Accra) 6.2 (1933): 1933-34.

Works on Ephraim Amu 

  • Agawu, V. Kofi. The impact of language on musical composition in Ghana: An introduction to the music style of Ephraim Amu. Ethnomusicology (1984): 37-73.
  • Agawu, V. Kofi, and Ephraim Amu. “The making of a composer.” Black Perspective in Music (1987): 51-63.
  • Agyemang, Fred M. Amu the African: a study in vision and courage. Asempa Publishers, Christian Council of Ghana, 1988.
  • Amu, Misonu. Stylistic and Textual Sources of contemporary Ghanaian Art Music composer. A case study: Dr. Ephraim Amu.Unpublished M. Phil, thesis presented to the Institute of African Studies, Univ. of Ghana, Legon (1988).
  • Professor Kwesi Ampene, on Dr Amu, CU West African Music High Life International Studies Centre

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  • Atiemo, Abamfo Ofori Singing with understanding’: the story of gospel music in Ghana.” Studies in world Christianity 12.2 (2006): 142-163.
  • Beeko, Anthony Antwi. The Trail Blazers: Fruits of the Presbyterian Church of Ghana, 1828-2003. Afram Publications Ghana Limited, 2004.
  • Dor, George. Uses of indigenous music genres in Ghanaian choral art music: Perspectives from the works of Amu, Blege and Dor. Ethnomusicology (2005): 441-475.
  • Flolu, James. “Music teacher education in Ghana: Training for the churches or schools?.” Sounds of Change–Social and Political Features of Music in Africa. Stockholm: SIDA (2004): 164-179.
  • Nketia, JH Kwabena. The Historical and Stylistic Background of the Music of Ephraim Amu. Ephraim Amu, Amu Choral Works 1 (1963).
  • Nketia, J. H. Modern trends, Ghana music. African Music (1957): 13-17.
  • Oehrle, Elizabeth. Emerging music education trends in Africa. The Int.  journal of music educ.1(1991)23-29
  • Turkson, A. R. “The Bi-musical approach of Ephraim Amu to music education in Ghana.” Eleventh International Research Seminar in Ghana. 1986.
  • promoted choral music in Ghana
  • Laryea, Philip T. Ephraim Amu: Nationalist, Poet and Theologian (1899-1995) (Foreword by Emeritus Professor J. H. K. Nketia), Akropong-Akuapem, Regnum  Africa, 2012
  • Professor Flolu, Emmanuel James (1994) Re-tuning music education in Ghana: a study of cultural influences and musical development, dilemma confronting Ghanaian school music teachers. PhD thesis, University of York.

Amu composed several musical pieces, briefly summed up among the others:

  1. “Fare thee well”
  2. “Mawɔ dɔ na Yesu”
  3. “Nkwagye Dwom”
  4. “Dwonto”
  5. “Yetu Osa”
  6. “Israel Hene”
  7. “Onipa da wo ho so”
  8. “Yaanom Abibirimma”
  9. “Yen Ara Asase Ni”
  10. “Adawura abo me”
  11. “Samansuo”
  12. “Ale-gbegbe”
  13. “Mia denyigba lɔ̃lɔ̃ la”

Dr Amu composed the next song below based on the traditional craft of Kente weaving of Ghanaian national costume. Vibrant colours of fabrics of the textiles is so bright and techniques of weaving sounds so rhythmic he composed next song. Kente is impressive but expensive was originally worn only by kings and queens for centuries. Made popular by leaders now available to all to wear on special occasions. In memory of Dr Amu Ghanaians wear cultural costumes on Fridays to work to celebrate their independence from colonialism. Still under economic yoke Dr Amu will not be amused would compose a new song.

Bonwire Kente Song:
Akyinkyinakyinkyin ama mahu nneɛma

Akyinkyinakyinkyin ama mahu nneɛma,
Akyinkyinakyinkyin ama mate nsɛmma,
Asante Bonwire Kente nwene deɛ,
Manhu bi da o,
Asante Bonwire Kente nwene deɛ,
Manhu bi da o,
Kwame nim adeɛ yɔ
Ne kente nwono na abɔ me gye
Ne nsa; ne nan, n’asadua saa nie:
Kro, kro, krohikro,
Hi, hi, hi, hi,
Krohikro hi krokrokro,
Hi, hi, hi, hi,
Krohikro,
Na ɛyɛ me dɛ o,
Na ɛyɛ me dɛ o,
Na abɔ me gye koraa,
Na ɛyɛ me dɛ o,
Na abɔ me gye koraa.
Roaming about has made me observe things,
Roaming about has made me hear of stories,
As for Asante Bonwire Kente weaving,
I’ve never seen some before
As for Asante Bonwire Kente weaving,
I’ve never seen some before
Kwame knows his craft His expert Kente weaving, amazes me.
His hands; his feet, the loom sound thus:
Kro, kro, krohikro,
Hi, hi, hi, hi,
Krohikro hi